Loading…

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Tuesday, June 18
 

8:00am EDT

Registration
Tuesday June 18, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm EDT
2nd Floor Foyer

8:00am EDT

Delaware Day Tour (ticketed event)
Participants will ride by bus to Hagley Museum and Library and will spend a morning discovering highlights of the library’s collections of books, prints, ephemera, and more. The participants will then travel to the University of Delaware’s Morris Library in Newark, Delaware, for lunch (included), followed by a tour of the library’s Special Collections’ Books and Manuscripts, as well as the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection, the latter of which will be conducted by Mark Samuels Lasner.
Transportation for this tour is generously sponsored by the University of Delaware Library, Museums and Press.

Schedule:
8:00 a.m. Board bus at Baltimore Marriott
9:30 a.m. Arrive Hagley Museum and Library
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Tour of Hagley Library
12:00-12:30 p.m. Travel to University of Delaware Morris Library
1:00-2:00 p.m. Lunch at Morris Library
2:00-4:00 p.m. Tour of UD Special Collections and Mark Samuels Lasner Collection in Morris Library
4:00 p.m. Board bus at Morris Library
5:30 p.m. Arrive back at conference hotel in Baltimore

Cost:  $30/person, includes lunch, maximum 24 people
Registration: Advance registration required. Select this tour on the RBMS 2019 registration form.



Tuesday June 18, 2019 8:00am - 5:30pm EDT
University of Delaware

9:00am EDT

Teaching Ecologies of Media (ticketed event)
Sponsored by Tavistock Books

The content of libraries and archives occupies a fairly brief portion of Earth’s long history recorded in ice, trees, fossils, and rocks—all of which David Sepkoski has described and interpreted as “The Earth As Archive.” But in response to climate change and an age controversially referred to as “The Anthropocene,” it is crucial to re-evaluate the media upon which human history is recorded and preserved in terms of how it impacts—and interacts with—the environment, since climate change threatens both earth and archive alike.

The purpose of this workshop is to offer an introduction to key concepts in ecology, eco-criticism, and media theory, with a view toward training professionals in using their collections to teach others about climate change. The day will begin with an introduction to ecologies of media, drawing from important recent work such as Jussi Parikka’s The Geology of Media and Françoise Vergès’s “Racial Capitalocene” in Futures of Black Radicalism. As a case study, we will consider the history of nature printing—using natural materials to make impressions—and experiment with making our own prints in an exercise that has been developed for participants to adapt to their own institutions. The session will conclude with a questionnaire for participants to fill out and discuss in terms of how their own institution relates to ecologies of the media they possess. By teaching sensitivity toward the ecologies of different media—from print to digital—participants will not only learn to use their collections to heighten awareness of climate change, but also by starting small, to generate comprehensive understandings about how the materiality and ecology of individual objects relate to the wider world.

Workshop fee (6/18/2019, 9:00am-12:00pm): $140 

Speakers
avatar for Brooke Palmieri

Brooke Palmieri

Founder; Editor of Printing History, Camp Books, American Printing History Association
A Philadelphia native now living in London, Brooke has worked on both sides of the Atlantic in libraries, bookshops, and as a writer, educator, and volunteer in archives and special collections, both institutional and community-run. In addition to running Camp Books, since 2015 Brooke... Read More →


Tuesday June 18, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
University Ballroom 1-2

9:00am EDT

Introduction to Rare Materials Cataloging for the Non-Cataloger (ticketed event)
Sponsored by Maggs Bros. Ltd.

The library catalog is a ubiquitous and essential tool in any special collections library, but how catalog records are created, what information does (and doesn’t) go into them, and the language used to discuss them can be opaque. This can cause confusion, create questions, hinder finding materials, and exacerbate gaps in communication as we all work towards our shared goals of helping patrons (and each other) find and access materials.

The goal of this workshop is to provide an introduction to rare materials cataloging for special collections practitioners who never, or rarely, find themselves creating catalog records. It will provide an overview of the types of information that are included in catalog records and where that information comes from. Participants will learn about common standards used to describe printed materials and about MARC (MAchine Readable Cataloging), the underpinning of many library catalogs. A concluding section will explore the history of cataloging practice and how that affects both contemporary practice and the array of records that practitioners are likely to find in their local catalogs and union catalogs, such as OCLC WorldCat. During hands-on exercises, participants will create bibliographic descriptions for modern and antiquarian materials and learn about the challenges of both original bibliographic description and copy cataloging. Throughout the session participants will be introduced to, in varying depth, AACR2, RDA, DCRM, NAF, LCSH, RBMS Controlled Vocabularies, AAT, MARC, and BIBFRAME, both what they mean and how they are used.

Workshop fee (6/18/2019, 9:00am-4:00pm):  $180



Speakers
AT

Amy Tims

Cataloging Initiatives Librarian, American Antiquarian Society
Amy Tims is a cataloger at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Mass., where she works with early American books and pamphlets. She holds a Master in Library Science degree, with a specialization in Rare Books and Manuscript Librarianship, from Indiana University, Bloomington... Read More →
BB

Brenna Bychowski

Catalog/Metadata Librarian, Beinecke Library, Yale University
Brenna Bychowski is a rare book cataloger at the Beinecke Library at Yale University, in New Haven, Conn. She works with a wide variety of printed materials, including books, serials, and an array of ephemera. She previously worked as a cataloger on the North American Imprints Program... Read More →


Tuesday June 18, 2019 9:00am - 4:00pm EDT
Promenade

9:00am EDT

Putting Guidelines into Practice: Using Backwards Design to Develop Outcomes and Activities from the Guidelines for Primary Source Literacy (ticketed event)
Sponsored by Voyager Press Rare Books and Manuscripts

In this workshop participants will engage with the “Guidelines for Primary Source Literacy” to create meaningful learning experiences based on primary source materials. The workshop will offer hands-on experience with pedagogical concepts such as backwards design, active learning, and formative assessment. Throughout the day, participants will build a toolkit of practical teaching tools grounded in the “Guidelines for Primary Source Literacy” with a focus on challenging aspects of primary source literacy, including teaching unique and unfamiliar formats, creator intent and bias, and gaps and absences in materials and collections. Participants will engage in collaborative learning techniques and reflection, culminating in an opportunity to collaboratively develop an instruction session based on collections at participants’ home institutions. The workshop is aimed at those in academic, public, and special institutions with some teaching experience, but it is not an advanced workshop.

Workshop fee (6/18/2019, 9:00am-4:00pm):  $180

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Holden

Jessica Holden

Reference Archivist, University of Masschusetts Boston
Jessica Holden is the Reference Archivist in the Joseph P. Healey Library at the University of Massachusetts Boston, where she manages the University Archives and Special Collections department's reference services and archival instruction program. She holds a BA in English from the... Read More →
SH

Sarah Horowitz

Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts and Head of Quaker and Special Collections, Haverford College
avatar for Marieke Van Der Steenhoven

Marieke Van Der Steenhoven

Special Collections Education and Outreach Librarian, Bowdoin College
Marieke Van Der Steenhoven is the Special Collections Education and Outreach Librarian at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. Marieke develops and delivers instructional, educational, and public programs that engage students, faculty, staff, and the public. Beyond instruction in... Read More →
avatar for Christine Cheng

Christine Cheng

Instruction & Outreach Librarian, University of California, Davis
Christine Cheng is the Instruction & Outreach Librarian for Special Collections at UC Davis Library. She designs library services and education programs that enhance access to and understanding of rare books, manuscripts, and archival materials. She creates exhibitions that spotlight... Read More →


Tuesday June 18, 2019 9:00am - 4:00pm EDT
University Ballroom 3-4

1:00pm EDT

Tour of the Baltimore Museum of Industry (ticketed event)
Join us for a tour of the Baltimore Museum of Industry (BMI). Located in a 1860s oyster cannery on the waterfront, the BMI celebrates Maryland’s industrial legacy and the lives of workers who built those industries.  Permanent displays highlight the history of food canning, garment production, a machine shop, a pharmacy, and a print shop with a working 1936 Linotype machine. This 90-minute tour will include six galleries and a stop at the museum’s window wall overlooking the harbor, with a discussion of Baltimore’s port industry.  

Schedule:
1:00 p.m. Gather in lobby of Baltimore Marriott for walk to Charm City bus stop
1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Tour of the Baltimore Museum of Industry *The cost of the tour includes museum admission, so those wishing to stay longer may do so.
3:30 p.m. Arrive back at the hotel

Cost: $15/person, includes public transportation, maximum of 20 people
Registration: Advance registration required. Select this tour on the RBMS 2019 registration form.


Tuesday June 18, 2019 1:00pm - 3:30pm EDT
Baltimore Museum of Industry

1:00pm EDT

The Material Evidence in Incunabula (MEI) Database and American Collections (ticketed event, meets at the Peabody Library)

Sponsored by Liber Antiquus Early Printed Books & Manuscripts

*Note: This workshop will meet at The George Peabody Library (17 E. Mount Vernon Place, Baltimore, MD 21202). Participants are responsible for their own transportation.*

Material evidence in Incunabula (MEI) is an international database, freely accessible, specifically designed to record and search the material evidence of 15th-century printed books: ownership, decoration, binding, manuscript annotations, stamps, prices, etc. The collaborative enterprise of over 400 European and American libraries, it contains over 40,000 high quality records and the identification of over 18,000 former owners.

MEI is hosted and maintained by the Consortium of European Research Libraries (CERL). MEI introduced an innovative approach to the recording of provenance: the application of geographical (GeoNames) and temporal indicators applied to every element of provenance, to track the movement of books over space and time during their 500 years of life. Now we are in the position to visualise the movement of thousands books, and to understand patterns and trends in the use and survival of early printed books. By integrating provenance data we are also reconstructing dispersed libraries and of course support the high-quality copy-specific cataloguing of every library with this kind of material.

A powerpoint will be distributed in advance; participants will be registered for editing the database in advance. This workshop will be held at the George Peabody Library, Johns Hopkins University, where participants will work with incunabula from the Peabody collections. Participants are responsible for getting themselves to the workshop, located about one mile from the conference hotel. Brought to you by the Bibliographical Society of America (BSA) and the Consortium of European Research Libraries (CERL).

Brought to you in part by the Bibliographical Society of America and the Consortium for European Research Libraries.

Workshop fee (6/18/2019, 1:00pm-4:00pm):  $140

Speakers
CD

Cristina Dondi

University of Oxford


Tuesday June 18, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
The George Peabody Library 17 E. Mount Vernon Place Baltimore, MD 21202

4:00pm EDT

RBMS Conference & Section Orientation
Sponsored by Jarndyce Antiquarian Booksellers

This session is highly recommended for first-time attendees and is also a nice refresher for past participants. You will learn about the history and structure of RBMS, hear pointers about how to navigate the conference, and find out how to get involved in the organization.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Dias De Fazio

Diane Dias De Fazio

Independent Curator of Rare Books and Book Arts
avatar for Erika Jenns

Erika Jenns

Engagement Consultant, Southern Tier Library System
Erika Jenns is Engagement Consultant at the Southern Tier Library System, a cooperative library system comprised of 48 library outlets across five counties (Allegany, Chemung, Schuyler, Steuben, and Yates) in Upstate New York. She provides guidance and support to member library staff... Read More →


Tuesday June 18, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm EDT
Stadium Ballroom 1-3

5:00pm EDT

New Members Mixer (ticketed event)
Sponsored by Atlas Systems

All are welcome to get to know new members and enjoy each other’s company. If you have yet to do so, you can purchase a ticket at the registration desk for $25 (includes appetizers and beverages).

Tuesday June 18, 2019 5:00pm - 6:30pm EDT
Stadium Ballroom 4-5

6:00pm EDT

Booksellers' Showcase Opening Reception
Co-sponsored by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America and William Reese Company

The Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA) is presenting a Booksellers’ Showcase on Tuesday evening and all day Wednesday. The showcase will feature 40 ABAA member exhibitors.  Visit the showcase and enjoy meeting booksellers, catching up with colleagues, and browsing books and other materials on display.

James Arsenault & Company, Arrowsic, ME
Lorne Bair Rare Books, Winchester, VA
Boston Rare Maps, Southampton, MA
Ian Brabner, Rare Americana, Wilmington, DE
Bromer Booksellers, Inc, Boston, MA
Michael Brown Rare Books, LLC, Philadelphia, PA
Caroliniana, Aiken, SC
Brian Cassidy, Bookseller, Silver Spring, MD
DeWolfe and Wood, Alfred, ME
Eclectibles, Tolland, CT
F.A. Bernett Books, Boston, MA
The Fine Books Company, Rochester, MI
Elena Gallego Rare Books LLC, San Antonio, TX
Franklin Gilliam :: Rare Books, Charlottesville, VA
Govi Rare Books LLC, New York, NY
James Gray Booksellers, Princeton, MA
Jeff Hirsch Books, Wadsworth, IL
Johanson Rare Books, Baltimore, MD
Johnson Rare Books & Archives, Covina, CA
The Kelmscott Bookshop, Baltimore, MD
Ben Kinmont Bookseller, Sebastopol, CA
John W. Knott, Jr., Bookseller, Laurel, MD
Langdon Manor Books, LLC, Houston, TX
Liber Antiquus, Early Books & Manuscripts, Chevy Chase, MD
LizzYoung Bookseller, Brooklyn, NY
Ken Lopez Bookseller, Hadley, MA
Oak Knoll Books, New Castle, DE
Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Company, Philadelphia, PA
Phillip Pirages Fine Books & Manuscripts, McMinnville, OR
Productive Arts, Bratenahl, OH
Rabelais Inc., Biddeford, ME
William Reese Company, New Haven, CT
Walter Reuben, Inc., West Hollywood, CA
Rootenberg Rare Books, Sherman Oaks, CA
Royal Books, Baltimore, MD
Garrett Scott, Bookseller, Ann Arbor, MI
Tavistock Books, Alameda, CA
Ten Pound Island Book Co., Gloucester, MA
Michael R Weintraub, Inc, New York, NY
Roy Young Bookseller, Ardsley, NY

Tuesday June 18, 2019 6:00pm - 8:00pm EDT
Grand Ballroom
 
Wednesday, June 19
 

7:30am EDT

Scholarship Breakfast (by invitation)
Sponsored by Atlas Systems

Gathering to celebrate recipients of RBMS 2019 Conference scholarships. Attendance is by invitation only.

Wednesday June 19, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am EDT
Promenade

7:30am EDT

Registration
Wednesday June 19, 2019 7:30am - 3:00pm EDT
2nd Floor Foyer

8:30am EDT

Plenary 1: Response & Responsibility
Sponsored by Smith College Libraries

What are the stakes of climate change for our communities? Why should we care...and how should we care? Our first plenary invites attendees into a conversation with perspectives on climate change science, policy, and implications for libraries, archives, and cultural heritage work.

Speakers:

Moderator
MH

Melissa Hubbard

University of Buffalo

Speakers
avatar for Brenda Ekwurzel

Brenda Ekwurzel

Senior Climate Scientist, Director of Climate Science, Union of Concerned Scientists
Brenda Ekwurzel is a senior climate scientist and the director of climate science for the Climate & Energy Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). In her role, she ensures that program analyses reflect robust and relevant climate science, and researches the influence of... Read More →
avatar for Bethany Nowviskie

Bethany Nowviskie

Dean of Libraries and Professor of English, James Madison University
avatar for Frances Beinecke

Frances Beinecke

Frances Beinecke served as Natural Resources Defense Council's (NRDC) president from 2006 to 2015. Under Beinecke’s leadership, NRDC focused on finding solutions to some of the biggest environmental challenges of our time, including establishing a clean energy future that curbs... Read More →


Wednesday June 19, 2019 8:30am - 10:15am EDT
Stadium Ballroom

10:15am EDT

Beverage Break with Booksellers
Sponsored by Henry Sotheran Limited

The Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA) is presenting a Booksellers’ Showcase on Tuesday evening and all day Wednesday. The showcase will feature 40 ABAA member exhibitors.  Visit the showcase and enjoy meeting booksellers, catching up with colleagues, and browsing books and other materials on display.

James Arsenault & Company, Arrowsic, ME
Lorne Bair Rare Books, Winchester, VA
Boston Rare Maps, Southampton, MA
Ian Brabner, Rare Americana, Wilmington, DE
Bromer Booksellers, Inc, Boston, MA
Michael Brown Rare Books, LLC, Philadelphia, PA
Caroliniana, Aiken, SC
Brian Cassidy, Bookseller, Silver Spring, MD
DeWolfe and Wood, Alfred, ME
Eclectibles, Tolland, CT
F.A. Bernett Books, Boston, MA
The Fine Books Company, Rochester, MI
Elena Gallego Rare Books LLC, San Antonio, TX
Franklin Gilliam :: Rare Books, Charlottesville, VA
Govi Rare Books LLC, New York, NY
James Gray Booksellers, Princeton, MA
Jeff Hirsch Books, Wadsworth, IL
Johanson Rare Books, Baltimore, MD
Johnson Rare Books & Archives, Covina, CA
The Kelmscott Bookshop, Baltimore, MD
Ben Kinmont Bookseller, Sebastopol, CA
John W. Knott, Jr., Bookseller, Laurel, MD
Langdon Manor Books, LLC, Houston, TX
Liber Antiquus, Early Books & Manuscripts, Chevy Chase, MD
LizzYoung Bookseller, Brooklyn, NY
Ken Lopez Bookseller, Hadley, MA
Oak Knoll Books, New Castle, DE
Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Company, Philadelphia, PA
Phillip Pirages Fine Books & Manuscripts, McMinnville, OR
Productive Arts, Bratenahl, OH
Rabelais Inc., Biddeford, ME
William Reese Company, New Haven, CT
Walter Reuben, Inc., West Hollywood, CA
Rootenberg Rare Books, Sherman Oaks, CA
Royal Books, Baltimore, MD
Garrett Scott, Bookseller, Ann Arbor, MI
Tavistock Books, Alameda, CA
Ten Pound Island Book Co., Gloucester, MA
Michael R Weintraub, Inc, New York, NY
Roy Young Bookseller, Ardsley, NY

Wednesday June 19, 2019 10:15am - 11:00am EDT
Grand Ballroom

10:15am EDT

Booksellers' Showcase
The Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA) is presenting a Booksellers’ Showcase on Tuesday evening and all day Wednesday. The showcase will feature 40 ABAA member exhibitors.  Visit the showcase and enjoy meeting booksellers, catching up with colleagues, and browsing books and other materials on display.

James Arsenault & Company, Arrowsic, ME
Lorne Bair Rare Books, Winchester, VA
Boston Rare Maps, Southampton, MA
Ian Brabner, Rare Americana, Wilmington, DE
Bromer Booksellers, Inc, Boston, MA
Michael Brown Rare Books, LLC, Philadelphia, PA
Caroliniana, Aiken, SC
Brian Cassidy, Bookseller, Silver Spring, MD
DeWolfe and Wood, Alfred, ME
Eclectibles, Tolland, CT
F.A. Bernett Books, Boston, MA
The Fine Books Company, Rochester, MI
Elena Gallego Rare Books LLC, San Antonio, TX
Franklin Gilliam :: Rare Books, Charlottesville, VA
Govi Rare Books LLC, New York, NY
James Gray Booksellers, Princeton, MA
Jeff Hirsch Books, Wadsworth, IL
Johanson Rare Books, Baltimore, MD
Johnson Rare Books & Archives, Covina, CA
The Kelmscott Bookshop, Baltimore, MD
Ben Kinmont Bookseller, Sebastopol, CA
John W. Knott, Jr., Bookseller, Laurel, MD
Langdon Manor Books, LLC, Houston, TX
Liber Antiquus, Early Books & Manuscripts, Chevy Chase, MD
LizzYoung Bookseller, Brooklyn, NY
Ken Lopez Bookseller, Hadley, MA
Oak Knoll Books, New Castle, DE
Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Company, Philadelphia, PA
Phillip Pirages Fine Books & Manuscripts, McMinnville, OR
Productive Arts, Bratenahl, OH
Rabelais Inc., Biddeford, ME
William Reese Company, New Haven, CT
Walter Reuben, Inc., West Hollywood, CA
Rootenberg Rare Books, Sherman Oaks, CA
Royal Books, Baltimore, MD
Garrett Scott, Bookseller, Ann Arbor, MI
Tavistock Books, Alameda, CA
Ten Pound Island Book Co., Gloucester, MA
Michael R Weintraub, Inc, New York, NY
Roy Young Bookseller, Ardsley, NY

Wednesday June 19, 2019 10:15am - 4:30pm EDT
Grand Ballroom

11:00am EDT

More than the Weather: Indigeneity, Race, and the Local Collection in the Age of Climate Change
Sponsored by William Reese Company

In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, scholars and librarians fetishized large repositories with collecting mandates that strayed far beyond the local. Mass digitization and the resulting aggregation, among other things, compel us to question whether the same logic applies as collections are brought together for study by researchers thousands of miles from where the collections live, or from the places documented in the collections they study. As climatic change becomes a more prominent concern, do place-based collections, and place-based knowledge, become more prominent too? Additionally, what is the impact of climatological disaster on collections that document indigenous and traditionally marginalized peoples, and on digital efforts meant to document and make accessible these histories? This panel addresses these questions through distinct lenses, beginning with the National Park Service’s efforts to document history across the country under often extreme conditions—economic, political, and climatological. The second presentation looks at how large sets of data trace words across time and place through snippets of text circulated and recycled in newspapers. Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s composition of “The Wreck of the Hesperus” (1840), this presentation considers how, as a result of its circulation as both a poem and as song, the work changed the land and those who inhabited that land. The final presentation reflects on how issues of race, place, and (digital) collecting intersect with climate change writ large:  Where do we find the stories of climate change? What are the roles of institutional and community collections in preserving such stories? What role can digital efforts like Mukurtu, Umbra Search African American History,  and other initiatives (e.g., UNC Chapel Hill's "Archivist in a Backpack," Documenting the Now) play in stewarding stories in the age of climate disaster? 

Speakers
avatar for Cecily Marcus

Cecily Marcus

Givens Collection/Umbra Search, University of Minnesota
Cecily Marcus is Principal Investigator of Umbra Search African American History (umbrasearch.org) and curator of the Givens Collection of African American Literature, the Performing Arts Archives, and the Upper Midwest Literary Archives at the University of Minnesota. Marcus has... Read More →
RC

Reginald Chapple

National Park Service
avatar for Molly O'Hagan Hardy

Molly O'Hagan Hardy

Independent Scholar
Molly O’Hagan Hardy has worked as the director of the library and archives at the Cape Ann Museum and as the the director for digital and book history initiatives at the American Antiquarian Society. Her work, both as an exhibition curator and digital humanities project director... Read More →


Wednesday June 19, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm EDT
University Ballroom 1-2

11:00am EDT

Papers on Water and Air
Heavy metals: Providing neutral information to a community rocked by scandal (Rebecca Hopman and Regan Brumagen, The Corning Museum of Glass Rakow Library)
In February 2016, Oregon state officials released the news that high levels of arsenic and cadmium were found in the air dangerously close to a high school, a primary school, and a day care facility. The likely sources were two nearby glass companies. The news of this environmental disaster caused an upheaval in the glass world, and many turned to the Rakow Library and The Corning Museum of Glass for answers. Artists, companies, journalists, and people living near the implicated glass companies wanted to know more about potential dangers and considered the Rakow Library – the library of record for glass – their source of reliable, up-to-date information. The questions continued to flood in several months later at the annual Glass Art Society conference, which happened to be held at the Museum. Given that this case was likely to go to court, library staff had to take the extra step of showing the Museum's legal team that we were providing accurate, neutral information and were not sharing anything that could be interpreted as advice. At the same time, we also had a responsibility to document these events and collect related information. We did so by creating vertical files on the topic and publishing a LibGuide, which provided links to news agencies covering the initial story and government websites with health and safety information related to glasses and heavy metals. While the initial uproar has died down, this remains an important environmental story with ongoing investigations, developments in the courts, and company closings, all of which we continue to document. In an era when trust in the media and governing bodies is at an all-time low, it is even more critical for libraries like ours to document and provide access to information on environmental disasters and issues related to climate change.

Documenting Nantucket Island's History Before It Sinks into the Sea  (Amelia Holmes, Nantucket Historical Association)
Erosion and rising sea levels are threatening Nantucket, an island located thirty miles off the coast of Massachusetts. Referred to by Vanity Fair as a “disappearing spit of land,” Nantucket will be underwater before much of the continental U.S. The uncertainty of climate change places an unquantifiable restraint on the Nantucket Historical Association’s (NHA) collections development and assessment activities. How do we document the island’s changing environmental landscape? How do we document an ephemeral community for future researchers who won’t be able to visit the island? How do we store collections knowing they will someday need to be moved to the mainland? What does “enduring research value” really mean when the longevity of your storage facilities, and even your institution, are uncertain? This presentation will engage with these questions, and offer ideas, tips, and resources to consider for special collections repositories documenting their community in preparation for climate change.

Without a Paddle: Archival Resources on Florida's Water  (Terrence Phillips and Michele Wilbanks, University of Florida)
Florida's environment is always at the forefront of politics and citizen concern. With water levels at a maximum from last fall's hurricanes, Florida faces another fall full of potential disasters. Pair that with an official ban on the word "climate change" from the Governor's office and Florida is on the verge of an environmental collapse. Our aim with this case study is to illuminate, broaden access, and organize materials from different collections that deal with Florida's environmental past and present. With prize-winning authors Jack E. Davis and Steven Noll on faculty at the University of Florida, the environmental history of Florida is a popular topic for student projects.There are finding aids organized in broad categories, but it is a daunting prospect to search all the inventories looking for the numerous keywords that could describe water, climate, or natural resources. We analyzed patron requests and class assignments to create a subject guide which facilitated access to materials that relate to Florida’s environment. Collections from Florida politicians including Bob Graham and George Smathers provided legislation related to environmental initiatives, while the writings of Marjorie Harris Carr and Arthur Marshall championed environmental activism. Additionally, the use of digitized historic aerial maps, frequently accessed by state agencies to analyze environmental changes, demonstrated the potential payoff of digital accessibility. This case study will consider our analysis of user patterns to connect related materials from unaligned collections to highlight primary sources about Florida’s environmental past and present, with the subject guide acting as the hub.

Speakers
RB

Regan Brumagen

Associate Librarian, Public Services, The Corning Museum of Glass Rakow Library
Regan Brumagen is the Associate Librarian for Public Services at The Corning Museum of Glass, Rakow Research Library. As a museum librarian, she answers reference questions, coordinates reference and instruction, and participates in outreach and exhibition planning. Before joining... Read More →
RH

Rebecca Hopman

Outreach Librarian, The Corning Museum of Glass Rakow Library
AH

Amelia Holmes

Nantucket Historical Association
avatar for Terrence Phillips

Terrence Phillips

Digital Services Specialist, University of Florida
I am currently the Digital Services Specialist for the University of Florida's Special and Area Studies department.I started working at the University of Florida’s Latin American Collection in high school before attending the University of South Florida in Tampa, FL. Having graduated... Read More →
avatar for Michele Wilbanks

Michele Wilbanks

Public Services Coordinator, University of Florida
I am the Coordinator of Public and Support Services in the Department of Special and Area Studies Collections at the University of Florida, directing all aspects of the public services operations. I manage the departmental email reference box, oversee the public services staff and... Read More →


Wednesday June 19, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm EDT
University Ballroom 3-4

11:00am EDT

Management & Leadership in a Time of Cultural Climate Change
Influenced by previous RBMS programming on leadership and management, this participant-led session will enable seasoned, new, and aspiring managers, and leaders at all levels, to speak frankly about their experiences and learn from each other in a confidential setting. Recognizing the need for strong leadership and management skills and inclusivity throughout our organizational hierarchies, this session addresses non-hierarchical approaches to leadership demand, and approaches to fostering the next generation's skill development and interest in leadership and management roles.

The format will be small, concurrent group discussions around a list of topics. Participants may select and move among groups according to their interests.

New Supervisors will focus on topics relevant to new managers, such as establishing yourself as “the boss,”
supervising staff more experienced than you, encouraging new professionals, and inclusive management. (facilitated by Annie Tang and Lisa Conathan)

Participatory Management will focus on balancing stakeholder and organizational needs, developing new peer groups, and developing an effective team. (facilitated by Moira Fitzgerald)

Leading without managing will focus on topics such as leading without a formal supervisory role and getting management experience. (facilitated by Melanie Griffin and Alison Reynolds)

Senior management will cover such topics as recruitment and retention, staff development, transitioning to the “big picture”. (facilitated by Lisa Carter and Christian Dupont)

Speakers
avatar for Lori Birrell

Lori Birrell

Head, Special Collections, University of Arkansas
As Head of the Special Collections Department at the University of Arkansas, my role is to provide strategic direction to our department in support of our strategic priorities. I lead a group of 13 dedicated and highly skilled faculty and staff members. Together we provide services... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Carter

Lisa Carter

Vice Provost for Libraries and University Librarian, University of Wisconsin Madison
avatar for Christian Dupont

Christian Dupont

Burns Librarian and AUL for Special Collections, Boston College
I have spent most of my career as a special collections librarian and administrator, beginning with reference and curatorial positions at the University of Notre Dame, where I also completed my doctoral studies in theology and philosophy. Along the way, I received a master of information... Read More →
avatar for Annie Tang

Annie Tang

Special Collections & Archives Coordinator, Chapman University
Originally from the LA area, Annie Tang is the Coordinator of Special Collections & Archives at Chapman University in Orange County, California. She was previously the Processing Archivist at Johns Hopkins University. Annie loves a good bowl of Vietnamese pho (pronounced ‘fuh... Read More →
avatar for Moira Fitzgerald

Moira Fitzgerald

Head of Access Services, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Yale University
Moira Fitzgerald is the Head of Access Services at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library (Yale University), a position she has held since 2015. In this role, she is responsible for all of the Beinecke's remote and on-site public services functions. Her interests include the... Read More →
avatar for Alison Reynolds

Alison Reynolds

Special Collections Archivist, Georgia Institute of Technology
Alison Reynolds joined Georgia Tech as the Special Collections Archivist in 2018. She holds an MLS from Indiana University Bloomington with a specialization in Archives and Records Management, an MA in English from the University of Connecticut, and BA degrees in English and History... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Conathan

Lisa Conathan

Head of Special Collections, Williams College
avatar for Melanie Griffin

Melanie Griffin

Assistant Head of Special Collections, University of Arkansas


Wednesday June 19, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm EDT
Promenade

11:00am EDT

Ethical Outreach with Culturally-Sensitive Content: Practices, Provocation, and Power
Sponsored by the Bibliographical Society of America 

Preparing timely and meaningful exhibits and outreach events is a crucial part of special collections and archives librarianship. Accomplishing this task in contemporary society often means engaging the public with materials that reflect histories of violence, racism, and oppression. Attendees of this seminar will learn from outreach specialists, collection curators, and faculty partners, who will share effective and responsible approaches to special collections outreach with these materials. Building upon previous conversations on this theme as it relates to other professional functions, this seminar turns the focus to the particular challenges related to outreach practices including exhibits, social media, and community events that purposefully engage the public with these materials and themes. Presenters will engage with questions such as: How do we present these materials ethically and conscientiously in the special collections outreach environment, and remain attentive to the risks of replicating these histories when presenting materials that document violent, racist, or oppressive acts? How do we call attention, in exhibits and outreach, to the materials that are missing both from the historical record and from our collections? How can we work to center voices representing oppressed communities both in the collections we highlight, and in the expertise we engage in all stages of the outreach process? How do we prepare special collections librarians and archivists in the profession to accomplish this work?

This seminar is brought to you by the RBMS Instruction and Outreach Committee and the RBMS Diversity Committee.

Moderator
GA

Grace Adeneye

University of Delaware

Speakers
MF

Myranda Fuentes

Institutional History Research Specialist, Dartmouth College
RA

Ruth Ann Jones

Special Collection Education and Outreach Librarian, Michigan State University
DC

Dr. Courtney R. Baker

Associate Professor, American Studies; Chair, Black Studies, Occidental College
AC

Allen Chen

Occidental College ’19
ET

Elizabeth Tibebu

Occidental College ’20


Wednesday June 19, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm EDT
Stadium Ballroom

11:00am EDT

Radical Making: Creative Engagement and Special Collections
Sponsored by Bromer Booksellers, Inc. 

This seminar will consider the creative, and specifically the radical, making process as part of the research, teaching, learning and collection building work in special collections. Taking two tracks, we will first examine not just creative material in and of itself in collections, but work through how and why we might be concerned with the creation processes of materials that become part of special collections. Then, extending from these considerations, we will turn to the work of developing programmatic space within special collections to create critical and reflective art and other material products with inspiration from and in conversation with special collections. Creating physical or digital artifacts in conversation with collections also offers ways into particularly powerful spaces for empowered learning and we are particularly interested in the ways in which these creative art-generating activities can serve to open up debate, celebration, communion and reflection on history. We hope to offer intellectual and creative provocations for teaching and learning work in special collections as well as advice and inspiration for taking such programmatic interventions forward.

Moderator
avatar for Jessica Pigza

Jessica Pigza

Outreach & Exhibits Librarian for Special Collections & Archives, UC Santa Cruz

Speakers
avatar for Emilie Hardman

Emilie Hardman

Head of Distinctive Collections, MIT
avatar for Johan Kugelberg

Johan Kugelberg

Curator/Seller, Boo-Hooray
Johan Kugelberg has more than 30 years of experience in the U.S. entertainment and art industries. From 1990 to 1994, he was the General Manager for Atlantic Records subsidiary Matador Records and a marketing and A&R executive for Def American Records from 1994 to 1997. He was the... Read More →
avatar for Kerry McAleer-Keeler

Kerry McAleer-Keeler

Associate Professor of Art and Design, Printmaking and Book Arts, Corcoran School of the Arts and Design, George Washington University
BIOMFA in Printmaking, George Washington University, BA, Concentration: Studio Art and Politics, Mount Holyoke CollegeKerry McAleer-Keeler is Associate Professor of Art and Design in printmaking and book arts at the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design, George Washington University... Read More →


Wednesday June 19, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm EDT
Chesapeake

12:30pm EDT

Lunch Break
Lunch on your own, unless attending lunch meetups

Wednesday June 19, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm EDT

12:30pm EDT

RBMS Lunch Meetups
Grab a quick bite, meet other first-time conference attendees, and chat about what you’ve seen so far, and where you’re going next. The meet ups are open to all conference-goers and are pay-your-own-way. Prices vary by location. Dining locations will feature options for every palate and dietary restriction. Sign-up  sheets will be available at the registration desk on a first-come, first-served basis until Wednesday at 10:00 a.m.


Wednesday June 19, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm EDT
Sign up at Registration Desk

1:30pm EDT

Edgar Allan Poe Collection at the Enoch Pratt Free Library
Experience the mysterious life and literary legacy of Edgar Allan Poe through the Enoch Pratt Free Library’s collections. You will have the opportunity to see one-of-a-kind artifacts from Poe’s life, including manuscript material, letters, and personal items from the library’s collections. You will get an up close look into Poe’s personal life and family, his writings, and some of what makes Poe an enduring and fascinating character, including original documents related to his mysterious, and still unsolved, death in Baltimore in 1849.

Schedule:
1:10 p.m. Gather in lobby of Baltimore Marriott to walk/cab/rideshare to Enoch Pratt Free Library
1:30 – 3:00 Tour with Michael K. Johnson, Manager, Special Collections, Enoch Pratt Free Library/Maryland’s State Library Resource Center
3:20 p.m. Return to hotel.

Cost:  Complimentary, maximum 25 people
Registration: First-come, first-served sign up. See Tours page for details.  


Wednesday June 19, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Enoch Pratt Free Library 400 Cathedral Street Baltimore, MD 21201

2:00pm EDT

Papers on Social Justice and Climate Change
It All Adds Up: Contributing Climate Change Data to the Community (Patrick Milhoan, Univeristy of Notre Dame)

Building Connections Between Social Justice and Climate Change at Michigan State University Special Collections (Jessica Martin, Tad Boehmer, Ruth Ann Jones, Michigan State University)

These two papers focus on the ways that special collections materials can play an active role in conversations surrounding climate change, from illuminating the social and political implications of a changing climate to sparking conversations about ways to address these challenges. By using the rich diversity of materials at the MSU Special Collections, which have a special focus on activism and social justice materials, this session will encourage other special collections librarians to consider the ways in which their unique collections can foster conversations surrounding the effects and challenges of a changing climate.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Milhoan

Patrick Milhoan

Lead Processing Archivist, University of Notre Dame
RA

Ruth Ann Jones

Special Collection Education and Outreach Librarian, Michigan State University
JM

Jessica Martin

Africana and International Cookbooks Curator, Michigan State University Libraries
I am currently the African Studies Librarian at Michigan State University, where I am also Adjunct Assistant Professor of History and the Curator of Africana and International Cookbooks in Libraries’ Special Collections. My current research interests are in the global history of... Read More →
TB

Tad Boehmer

Michigan State University Libraries


Wednesday June 19, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT
University Ballroom 1-2

2:00pm EDT

The Limits to Growth
Sponsored by Arthur Fournier Fine & Rare, LLC

In 1972, researchers from MIT published The Limits to Growth, sharing results of computer simulations predicting outcomes for the earth’s resources related to population and economic growth. If growth continued unchecked, they predicted “overshoot and collapse” of global systems by the late 21st century, but that a “sustainable world” was possible if growth patterns altered. Now a touchstone in the environmental movement, it sparked conversations about sustainability that continue today.

For decades, archives and special collections have measured progress by rate of collection growth and prestige by size of collections. While colleagues in the circulating library have developed sophisticated collective collection strategies as an alternative to building comprehensive collections, the growth imperative has gone relatively unexamined in special collections. This panel will explore our responsibilities related to resource allocation and collection growth in the age of climate change, imagine what it might look like to alter our growth patterns, and consider what we might lose or gain in the process.   

Speakers
avatar for Maureen Callahan

Maureen Callahan

Sophia Smith Collection Archivist, Smith College
Maureen Callahan is the steward for the Sophia Smith Collection of Women's History at Smith College, where she provides collection development, instruction, and stewardship for records of people changing the world on behalf of women and other gender minorities.
avatar for Shannon K. Supple

Shannon K. Supple

Curator of Rare Books, Smith College
Shannon K. Supple is the steward of the Mortimer Rare Book Collection at Smith College. She teaches, provides research support, conducts outreach activities, and curates collections of rare and curious printed books, literary manuscripts, artists’ books, and graphic arts. Shannon... Read More →
avatar for William Stingone

William Stingone

Associate Director, Preservation and Special Collections Processing, New York Public Library
William Stingone leads Preservation and Special Collections Processing at the New York Public Library, a unit responsible for the management and preservation of NYPL’s Research Libraries collection and for the processing of its special collections. At NYPL, William has also served... Read More →
avatar for Chela Weber

Chela Weber

Sr Program Officer, Research Library Partnership, OCLC
Chela Scott Weber is a Sr Program Officer for the OCLC Research Library Partnership. She previously helped to create and lead the Archival Collections Management department at NYU Libraries, where she also served as the Associate Head of the Tamiment Library & Wagner Labor Archive... Read More →


Wednesday June 19, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT
University Ballroom 3-4

2:00pm EDT

The Work of Leaving Work: How to Move Up, Leave, or Pause a Job Successfully
Landing an archives and special collections job may feel like the end of all need for planning and strategizing in one’s career. However, as our working lives evolve, whether through retirement, moves to new institutions or positions, or for shorter-term pauses such as family-related leaves, transferring of responsibilities to junior colleagues, research leave, or medical leave, planning ahead can make these transitions much smoother. So, how does one plan for these kinds of challenges and opportunities, and the adjustment periods into and out of them?

Building on the last two years of successful participatory sessions around working lives, this session will serve as a bookend in the “Work of … Work” trilogy, providing a space for discussion around the very real, yet rarely spoken of issues related to stopping, pausing, and transitioning out of work.

Aimed at all levels of professionals, the session will include brief remarks from a panel of speakers, acting as session leaders, who will start the conversation by providing insight into their own experiences. Following this introduction, participants will break into smaller groups around their area(s) of interest, allowing closer engagement and discussion, followed by a wrap-up where final thoughts can be shared with the entire group. Topics of conversation will include: easing transitions for those dealing with family planning, succession planning, and leaving senior roles. Participants will be welcome to move between groups at specific points, and a facilitator will visit each section throughout the discussion period to enable smooth transition and time-keeping.


Speakers
avatar for Lori Birrell

Lori Birrell

Head, Special Collections, University of Arkansas
As Head of the Special Collections Department at the University of Arkansas, my role is to provide strategic direction to our department in support of our strategic priorities. I lead a group of 13 dedicated and highly skilled faculty and staff members. Together we provide services... Read More →
avatar for Beth Turcy Kilmarx

Beth Turcy Kilmarx

Assistant Dean of Libraries, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
I am currently the Assistant Dean of Libraries for Assessment, Development and Technical Services at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Univeristy Libraries (IUP). I am responsible for initiating several policy, planning and assessment projects including the creation of the University... Read More →
avatar for Erika Jenns

Erika Jenns

Engagement Consultant, Southern Tier Library System
Erika Jenns is Engagement Consultant at the Southern Tier Library System, a cooperative library system comprised of 48 library outlets across five counties (Allegany, Chemung, Schuyler, Steuben, and Yates) in Upstate New York. She provides guidance and support to member library staff... Read More →
LB

Lois Black

Lehigh University
avatar for Kimberly Tully

Kimberly Tully

Curator of Rare Books, Temple University
Kimberly Tully is Curator of Rare Books in the Special Collections Research Center at Temple University Libraries. Her previous positions include Curator of Special Collections at Miami University of Ohio, Special Collections Librarian for Rare and Printed Materials at Harvard Business... Read More →
avatar for Daniel J. Slive

Daniel J. Slive

Head of Special Collections, Bridwell Library, Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University
Daniel J. Slive is Head of Special Collections at the Bridwell Library in the Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, a position he has held since 2008. His previous professional positions have included Reference Librarian at the John Carter Brown Library... Read More →
avatar for Zach Johnson

Zach Johnson

Curator of Special Collections, Vanderbilt University


Wednesday June 19, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT
Promenade

2:00pm EDT

New Spaces for Old Things: The Realities of Renovation, Before, During and After
Renovations of special collections repositories seem to be an ongoing reality for many of us in the profession – many colleagues are either planning for, in the midst of, or recovering from a recent renovation. While presenting the opportunity for enhanced space, better climate control, increased teaching and storage capacities as well as other positives, renovations can also bring disruption to regular services, changes to staffing patterns and responsibilities, the necessity of moving and transporting large segments of materials, and concerns regarding short and long-term preservation and security of materials. This seminar hopes to address the ways and means by which special collections professionals can be best prepared for renovation discussions and planning, and the implementation of transitional services before, during - and after - the process.

Speakers
avatar for Tim J Johnson

Tim J Johnson

Curator/Assoc. Librarian, University of Minnesota
I've been a librarian since 1982, mostly in academic settings. At the moment I'm Curator of Special Collections & Rare Books at the University of Minnesota and the E. W. McDiarmid Curator of the Sherlock Holmes Collections (the largest such collection in the world). When not in a... Read More →
SH

Sarah Horowitz

Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts and Head of Quaker and Special Collections, Haverford College
avatar for Frances Fox

Frances Fox

Architect, Library Strategist, Cannon Design


Wednesday June 19, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT
Chesapeake

2:00pm EDT

We have Guidelines, now what? Putting Primary Source Literacy into practice in the special collections classroom
This seminar will continue the conversation begun last year at the RBMS 2018 session “Primary Source Literacy as a Tool for Student Engagement and Faculty Partnerships.” This iteration will provide further ideas on how the ACRL/RBMS-SAA Guidelines for Primary Source Literacy can inform our instruction philosophies and methods. The panel will open with a discussion of the ACRL Frameworks for Information Literacy for Higher Education by an Information Literacy Instruction librarian.  Since the Framework was ratified in 2015, our ILI colleagues have had several years of living into the new standards and so can reflect on how the Framework has changed the shape of ILI. With that experience in mind, the other three speakers will reflect on how we can use the Guidelines to rethink how we do instruction individually and collaboratively, overall and for specific courses, and how we assess our instruction efforts. Participants will come away with concrete ideas to help them leverage the Guidelines in their instruction sessions


Moderator
avatar for Anna Franz

Anna Franz

Assistant Head of Access Services, Yale University
I manage our very active classrooms, co-manage the reading room, and supervise about half of our department's staff. Every day is a new exercise in balancing access and preservation, users' expectations and what's possible. I'm always happy to chat about teaching with collections... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Maureen Maryanski

Maureen Maryanski

Education and Outreach Librarian, Indiana University
As the Education and Outreach Librarian at Indiana University's Lilly Library, I coordinate 250-300 classes and tours annually and provide special collections instruction grounded in the history of the book, experiential learning, and primary source literacy. My work as part of a... Read More →
avatar for Emily Kader

Emily Kader

Rare Book Research Librarian, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
I oversee instruction and reference relating to rare books and special collections at Wilson Special Collections Library, which is part of the University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As part of our Research and Instructional Services Department, I... Read More →
avatar for Ashleigh Coren

Ashleigh Coren

Special Collections Librarian for Teaching and Learning, University of Maryland
avatar for Wendy Hardenberg

Wendy Hardenberg

Southern Connecticut State University


Wednesday June 19, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm EDT
Stadium Ballroom

3:30pm EDT

Beverage Break with Booksellers
Sponsored by Henry Sotheran Limited

The Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA) is presenting a Booksellers’ Showcase on Tuesday evening and all day Wednesday. The showcase will feature 40 ABAA member exhibitors.  Visit the showcase and enjoy meeting booksellers, catching up with colleagues, and browsing books and other materials on display.

James Arsenault & Company, Arrowsic, ME
Lorne Bair Rare Books, Winchester, VA
Boston Rare Maps, Southampton, MA
Ian Brabner, Rare Americana, Wilmington, DE
Bromer Booksellers, Inc, Boston, MA
Michael Brown Rare Books, LLC, Philadelphia, PA
Caroliniana, Aiken, SC
Brian Cassidy, Bookseller, Silver Spring, MD
DeWolfe and Wood, Alfred, ME
Eclectibles, Tolland, CT
F.A. Bernett Books, Boston, MA
The Fine Books Company, Rochester, MI
Elena Gallego Rare Books LLC, San Antonio, TX
Franklin Gilliam :: Rare Books, Charlottesville, VA
Govi Rare Books LLC, New York, NY
James Gray Booksellers, Princeton, MA
Jeff Hirsch Books, Wadsworth, IL
Johanson Rare Books, Baltimore, MD
Johnson Rare Books & Archives, Covina, CA
The Kelmscott Bookshop, Baltimore, MD
Ben Kinmont Bookseller, Sebastopol, CA
John W. Knott, Jr., Bookseller, Laurel, MD
Langdon Manor Books, LLC, Houston, TX
Liber Antiquus, Early Books & Manuscripts, Chevy Chase, MD
LizzYoung Bookseller, Brooklyn, NY
Ken Lopez Bookseller, Hadley, MA
Oak Knoll Books, New Castle, DE
Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Company, Philadelphia, PA
Phillip Pirages Fine Books & Manuscripts, McMinnville, OR
Productive Arts, Bratenahl, OH
Rabelais Inc., Biddeford, ME
William Reese Company, New Haven, CT
Walter Reuben, Inc., West Hollywood, CA
Rootenberg Rare Books, Sherman Oaks, CA
Royal Books, Baltimore, MD
Garrett Scott, Bookseller, Ann Arbor, MI
Tavistock Books, Alameda, CA
Ten Pound Island Book Co., Gloucester, MA
Michael R Weintraub, Inc, New York, NY
Roy Young Bookseller, Ardsley, NY

Wednesday June 19, 2019 3:30pm - 4:30pm EDT
Grand Ballroom

3:45pm EDT

Tour of the ABAA Booksellers’ Showcase
This informal introduction to the showcase will allow attendees to meet with various dealers, examine items, and consider how materials on the market can be utilized for instruction and research as well as in building collections. First-come, first-served sign up. See Tours page for details.  

Tours will be led by E.C. Schroeder, Beinecke Library - Yale University, and Daniel J. Slive, Bridwell Library - Southern Methodist University.

Wednesday June 19, 2019 3:45pm - 4:30pm EDT
Promenade

6:00pm EDT

Restaurant Night
Restaurant Night is a conference tradition. Small groups of conference participants can get to know one another while visiting some of the best restaurants in Baltimore (each restaurant-goer is responsible for their bill). Sign-up sheets will be available at the registration desk on a first-come, first-served basis until Wednesday at 11:00 a.m.


Wednesday June 19, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm EDT
Sign up at Registration Desk
 
Thursday, June 20
 

8:00am EDT

Registration
Thursday June 20, 2019 8:00am - 4:00pm EDT
2nd Floor Foyer

8:30am EDT

Plenary 2: Documentation of Climate Change Paradigms
Sponsored by Michael Brown Rare Books

Pursuing the evidence of climate change, and human communities’ relationships to this phenomenon, requires research within and outside archives and libraries. Our second plenary explores climate change narratives built on “documents” beyond our ordinary collecting contexts, as well as how the types of evidence available for these histories affect notions of causality, accountability, uncertainty, and hope.

Speakers:

Moderator
avatar for Elizabeth Cruces

Elizabeth Cruces

Hispanic Collections Archivist, University of Houston
Elizabeth Lisa Cruces is the Hispanic Collections Archivist and Curator at University of Houston. Her research interest include power and oppression in archives, memory making, community archives, zines, and the application fronterizmo in archives.

Speakers
avatar for Dagomar Degroot

Dagomar Degroot

Associate Professor of Environmental History, Georgetown University
Dr. Dagomar Degroot is an associate professor of environmental history at Georgetown University. His work focuses on social responses to extreme environments and extreme environmental changes. His first book, The Frigid Golden Age, was published by Cambridge University Press and... Read More →
avatar for Neela Banerjee

Neela Banerjee

Inside Climate News
Neela Banerjee is a Washington-based reporter for Inside Climate News. She led the investigation into Exxon's early climate research, which was a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service reporting and the recipient of nearly a dozen other journalism awards. Before joining... Read More →


Thursday June 20, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am EDT
Stadium Ballroom

10:00am EDT

Beverage Break & Poster Session I
Sponsored by Sotheby's

Endangered Caribbean Cultural Heritage: A Study of Climate Change Management Strategies in Three Jamaican Institutions (Jessica C. Lewis and Bernadette Worrell-Johnson, The University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica)

Preserving Archival Collections while Preserving the Environment: How Severn Library Has Reduced the Carbon Footprint of SCUA (Elizabeth Caringola and Charlotte Johnson, University of Maryland, College Park)

Activating Special Collections Resources for Climate Change Research
(Lauren Williams and Elis Ing, McGill University)

Silencing Sam: Starting Conversations about Institutional Racism in the First-Year Writing Classroom (Cait Kennedy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

After the Low-Hanging Fruit Has Been Plucked: Archives in the Era of Costly Sustainability [link] (Mark Wolfe, University at Albany)

An Analysis of Archival References in Peer Reviewed History Journals  (Kris Bronstad, University of Tennessee)

See full descriptions of posters  from Poster Session I


Speakers
avatar for Liz Caringola

Liz Caringola

Archival Metadata Librarian, University of Maryland, College Park
avatar for Mark Wolfe

Mark Wolfe

Curator of Digital Collections, University at Albany
Mark Wolfe was the Project Coordinator on the U.S. InterPARES Project from 2003 to 2006. Since 2007, he has worked as a Curator of Digital Collections at the University at Albany. While I will talk about bits and bytes, I'm most excited to talk about sustainability in the archival... Read More →
avatar for Kris Bronstad

Kris Bronstad

Modern Political Archivist and Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee
I am interested in archives, hidden collections, humanities, media, language, history, who tells the stories, how they do it, and what fer.
avatar for Cait Kennedy

Cait Kennedy

Research and Instruction Associate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for Charlotte Johnson

Charlotte Johnson

Library Services Specialiist, University of Maryland
I work at UMD Libraries' high density shelving facility. I manage intake projects, working especially closely with Special Collections.
avatar for Jessica C. Lewis

Jessica C. Lewis

Head, West Indies and Special Collections, The University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica
avatar for Bernadette Worrell-Johnson

Bernadette Worrell-Johnson

Special Collections Librarian, The University of the West Indies, Mona
LW

Lauren Williams

McGill University
avatar for Elis Ing

Elis Ing

McGill University
I'm relatively new to the wonderful world of rare books and special collections. People should talk to me about the fur trade, ecopsychology, and children's books.



Thursday June 20, 2019 10:00am - 10:45am EDT
Grand Ballroom ABC

10:45am EDT

Climate Change Changes Us: Collections Security in the Context of Natural Disasters

Climate change increases the probability of natural disasters even in areas previously deemed safe for special collections storage. As library staff, we need to be prepared not only to adequately respond to a disaster, but also to recover from it and restore access to our collections as quickly as possible. In the face of floods, fires, and earthquakes, strict adherence to normal security protocols can actually put our collections in danger, yet adopting special security practices in a moment of crisis can also bring new, unknown challenges to the forefront. How do we respond while still keeping ourselves and our collections safe, both in the moment of a disaster, and in the long aftermath? In this panel session, three speakers will present on the following topics:

Greg Prickman, currently of the Folger Shakespeare Library, will discuss his experiences dealing with a devastating flood that tore through the University of Iowa campus in 2008. While the Libraries escaped with only minimal damage, preparations in the weeks leading up to the flood were initially careful and ultimately frantic, as the nature of the threat grew and became better understood. This paper will consider lessons learned from planning under pressure, and how our notions of collection security evolve as circumstances change rapidly.

Ashley Jones of the Linda Hall Library will describe her work creating and executing disaster preparedness plans at multiple institutions. A good disaster preparedness plan is general, flexible, and scalable, with contingencies for specific actions and actors where necessary. That said, our collections are most secure when we make and follow carefully-tailored plans for the movement and care of our materials. This paper will explore ways special collections libraries can address the expectations and realities of security in environmentally compromised spaces, balancing the priorities of library staff, first responders, facility personnel, outside vendors, and even the media.

Natalia Sciarini, of Yale University’s Beinecke Library, will describe a flood in the Beinecke stacks which happened in April 2018, covering why and how it happened; how Access Services, Security, and Preservation responded; what we have done for disaster recovery, and what lessons library staff has learned from it.


Moderator
avatar for Carly Sentieri

Carly Sentieri

Research Services Librarian for Special Collections, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Jones

Ashley Jones

Preservation & Conservation Librarian, The Linda Hall Library
I joined the Linda Hall Library in February of 2018 as their first preservation librarian in almost a decade. Previously I spent ten years as Preservation Librarian at Miami University Libraries. At Linda Hall, I am responsible for all preservation planning and activities, including... Read More →
avatar for Natalia Sciarini

Natalia Sciarini

Librarian for Collection management, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale
avatar for Greg Prickman

Greg Prickman

Eric Weinmann Librarian and Director of Collections, Folger Shakespeare Library
I joined the Folger Shakespeare Library in July, 2018 after 12 years at the University of Iowa Libraries. At the Folger I manage all aspects of the library and collection, including curation, acquisitions, cataloging, digitization, conservation, and public service.


Thursday June 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
University Ballroom 1-2

10:45am EDT

Geoscience Re-interprets Special Collections Related to Coal Mining, Natural Gas, and Oil Wells
Each of the papers in this session will address three of the conference themes: the capacity of our existing collections to illuminate “hidden” histories relevant to climate change; the possibility of new services or outreach initiatives to support public awareness related to climate change and the environment; and the role of special collections in communities responding to climate change, including relative to issues of environmental justice.

Dr. Harrison Wick will discuss climate change and environmental disasters related to Pennsylvania coal culture. His research has led to the discovery of many hidden resources in the Special Collections at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) that can be better utilized to understand climate change and environmental disasters.

Dr. Steven Hovan will discuss his research into the abandoned oil and gas wells that exist in Pennsylvania. There are literally hundreds of thousands of wells that were drilled throughout Pennsylvania since oil was first discovered in 1859. Well Mapper is a mobile application to provide a simple, user-friendly tool to submit the location, photographs, and environmental conditions of abandoned oil and gas wells. Well Mapper hopes to capitalize on crowdsourced information from citizen-scientists about abandoned oil and gas wells and to mine data collected from historical map collections to add new information about the location and condition of abandoned well sites. This research provides state agencies, university researchers, and private stakeholders new tools to collaborate and to reduce the impact that these wells have on public safety and environmental conditions in Pennsylvania. By utilizing historic mining maps, researchers can identify the location of abandoned mines to study and address environmental issues such as the release of methane gas from natural gas production and its impact on global climate change. Quantitative studies using archival records to document climate change are critical to understanding global climate change and the impacts human activities may have on the Earth and its atmosphere.

Dr. Miriam Intrator and Stacey Lavender will discuss how Ohio University Libraries is approaching the challenges of preserving and promoting collections that tell important stories of climate change and environmental impact. We hold several manuscript collections documenting over one hundred years of the history of coal mining in southeastern Ohio and its lingering effects on the Appalachian region. These collections contain papers, maps and plans, photographs, and audiovisual materials, and cover topics including daily life for those working in or living near (or on top of) mines, labor organizations and mine workers' rights, health and safety concerns, and short and long term effects on the climate and environment. When viewed as a whole, the personal stories illuminated in these disparate collections reveal issues of national environmental importance. We feel a responsibility to preserve and actively share this history with our community and the larger public, but there are several gaps in description, preservation, and access that prevent us from doing this as fully as we would like. Improved housing, enhanced inventories, and more comprehensive finding aids are critical for reading room access, while digitization projects and a more unified web presence for these collections would help us reach patrons virtually. We seek to promote engagement with these materials through exhibits and other public programming, along with developing partnerships and collaborations with interested faculty and University initiatives such as mAppAthens in order to promote use in the classroom. In our presentation we will discuss early steps to prioritize and address these issues while working within the confines of limited staff and budget.

Moderator
avatar for Beth Turcy Kilmarx

Beth Turcy Kilmarx

Assistant Dean of Libraries, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
I am currently the Assistant Dean of Libraries for Assessment, Development and Technical Services at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Univeristy Libraries (IUP). I am responsible for initiating several policy, planning and assessment projects including the creation of the University... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Miriam Intrator

Miriam Intrator

Special Collections Librarian, Ohio University
SL

Stacey Lavender

Ohio University
avatar for Harrison Wick

Harrison Wick

Special Collections Librarian and University Archivist, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Since 2007, Dr. Wick has served as the Special Collections Librarian and University Archivist at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP). Many of the archival research requests that he answers relate to institutional history, the industrial heritage of Pennsylvania, and the Rare... Read More →
avatar for Steven Hovan

Steven Hovan

Chairperson, Geoscience Dept., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Steve Hovan is Chairperson of the Geoscience Department at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include ancient climates and global wind systems, and more recently the environmental impact of “legacy” oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania. In particular he works... Read More →



Thursday June 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
Chesapeake

10:45am EDT

“Come Hell and High Water”: The Role of Archivists, Historical Myths, and Activism in Communities Facing Repeated Extreme Flooding Events
With the names Harvey, Sandy, and Katrina ringing loudly in our ears – can we still learn valuable lessons from the archives of Diane, Camille, and Agnes? In many cases, we thought we had, but climate change is increasingly contributing to more frequent and violent tropical cyclogenesis, repeated extreme flooding, and rising oceans. These events have opened questions of survival for communities across the United States. In a 2013 article titled “Come Hell and High Water,” activist and author Bill McKibben posed the questions “what's an appropriate response? What even begins to match the magnitude of the trouble we face?” How can archives respond? In this session, a group of panelists will each provide brief professional statements and thematic discussions addressing such questions, followed by a town hall participatory discussion. We will discuss how our profession can help educate the public regarding history and myths surrounding climate, weather, response and recovery.

Moderator
avatar for Jay-Marie Bravent

Jay-Marie Bravent

Special Collections Research Center, University of Kentucky Libraries

Speakers
avatar for Kari A. Greenwalt

Kari A. Greenwalt

National Museum of Civil War Medicine
With over 20 years of experience in museums and cultural heritage, Kari currently serves as retail manager at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Pry House Field Hospital Museum and Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office Museum, and previously served as assistant manager of the... Read More →
avatar for Shawn Gladden

Shawn Gladden

Howard County Historical Society
Mr. Gladden is a 15 year Museum Professional having worked at the Maryland Historical Society, the Baltimore Museum of Industry, The Society for the Preservation of Fell's Point and Federal Hill, and is now the Executive Director of the Howard County Historical Society.  A Howard... Read More →
avatar for Peter Coutu

Peter Coutu

The Virginian-Pilot
Peter Coutu is a reporter and staff writer on the Virginia Beach team, covering the southern parts of the city, sea level rise, flooding, and transportation.  A Midwesterner, Peter holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism and history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Thursday June 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
Stadium Ballroom

10:45am EDT

Sustainable Programming at our Conferences and Institutions
See bit.ly/sustainableRBMS for bibliography and session notes.

---

This session will consider the carbon footprint of our networking and outreach models. We will interrogate “givens” such as swag culture and conference travel. An introduction by the organizers will include information about the work of the Sustainability Subcommittee on the 2019 conference, data about the carbon footprint of the conference, and a brief overview of the literature on topics of sustainability in libraries, archives, and museums.

The majority of the session will be devoted to conversation in break-out groups, with each group dedicated to a specific discussion topic. Note takers from each group will summarize their findings in a shared Google doc generated and distributed after the session, from which participants can bring action items to their institutions or which can inspire future RBMS action items.

Questions to be addressed might include:
  • Is your institution talking about climate change and sustainability in a practical and proactive way?
  • What particular practices do you see that ought to be reconsidered? Can you suggest potential improvements/solutions?
  • What standards should swag meet (budget, material types, labor practices, local providers)?
  • What are swag’s outreach objectives and how do we measure if it meets those goals? What swag is the most desirable/usable to patrons?
  • Following up on the example of swag, what other “stuff” might we interrogate (packing materials for transporting rare materials, preservation supplies, printing, digital storage, etc.)?
  • What are the opportunities for conference sustainability?
  • What are the barriers to conference sustainability?
  • How can future RBMS programming provide tools you need to mitigate and address the professional  implications of climate change (e.g., could RBMS articulate best practices around emergency training, collection development policies, etc.)?
  • What work are you aware of in other organizations, or what would you love to see in RBMS?

Attendees will leave the session better prepared to articulate the intersections and implications of climate change for our profession and, we hope, motivated to continue this conversation within RBMS and at their home institutions. Our goal is to encourage participants to consider, as professionals involved in the long-term preservation of cultural heritage, whether current practices are at odds with our professional mission.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Hildreth Chen

Amy Hildreth Chen

English and Communication Librarian, University of Iowa
I worked in Special Collections at Emory University, the University of Alabama, and the University of Iowa although I am currently serving in the Humanities and Social Sciences division as the English and Communications Librarian. I wrote Archival Bodies: The American Literary Collections... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Burke Cahalan

Sarah Burke Cahalan

Director, Marian Library, University of Dayton
Religious collections, natural history, work/life balance, culture change, collection moves, preservation, etc. etc. Looking forward to seeing everyone at the upcoming conference!


Thursday June 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
Promenade

10:45am EDT

Enabling Inclusive Online Spaces
Online spaces are today's public square. From twitter to listservs to chatstreams, users gather in these spaces to find their peers and to enter into new professional and personal realms. But the dynamics in these communities can also discourage people from participating, especially if they are from underrepresented groups. An insistence on free speech, long valued by internet denizens, is often used as a cover for abusive language. And the anonymous, instantaneous dynamics of digital communication let some feel that they can say anything without repercussions. This participatory session is driven by recent kerfuffles in rare materials spaces that have emphasized the importance of creating inclusive discussion spaces for topics central to our profession. But it also recognizes that as more library outreach takes place in digital spaces, the more important it is that those spaces present a field that is open and receptive to diverse members. Those inclusive spaces don't happen magically, but through careful nurturing of community norms. The session will begin with the moderators giving some short comments to help frame the group's conversations. Melissa Hubbard will help situate the discussion within the framework of professional ethics. Sarah Werner would bring in some of the tools of feminist pedagogy as a way of understanding conversational dynamics. Curtis Small will offer a perspective from the RBMS Diversity Committee. The bulk of the session will focus on small-group conversations to generate ideas about how to enable inclusive online spaces. Coming up with specific tactics will be urged, so that the group can collectively build a resource we can all draw on. The process of our discussion will serve as a model for inclusive behavior that encourages broad participation.

Speakers
MH

Melissa Hubbard

University of Buffalo
CS

Curtis Small

Senior Assistant Librarian, University of Delware Library, Museums and Press
Coordinator of Public Services for the Special Collections department of University of Delaware Library. A project member of Colored Conventions, a digital humanities project based at University of Delaware..


Thursday June 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
University Ballroom 3-4

10:45am EDT

Poster Perusal Session I
Sponsored by Sotheby's 

Enjoy a little extra time with all the great posters presented in Poster Session 1. Presenters may not be present during this time, but feel free to browse at your leisure and soak in all this great visual content.

Thursday June 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom East/West

10:45am EDT

Sustainable Approaches to Collections Stewardship in Uncertain Times
Sponsored by Franklin Gilliam :: Rare Books 

Wondering how to create a stable environment for your special collections without wrecking ours? Come hear the experiences of recent NEH awardees as they discuss sustainable approaches to collections care. They will cover the work involved in bringing together interdisciplinary teams of collections managers, facilities staff, engineers, and consultants; the testing and implementation of sustainable preservation strategies; and their institution’s current needs and future goals. As part of NEH’s Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections grant program, these projects are case studies on preventive conservation measures that prolong the useful life of collections and support institutional resilience by balancing effectiveness, cost, and environmental impact. We hope to elicit candid discussion on the opportunities and challenges involved in sustainable preservation programs, as well as provide actionable steps for participants to consider when managing their own collections and facilities.

Moderator
avatar for Cathleen Tefft

Cathleen Tefft

Senior Program Officer, National Endowment for the Humanities

Speakers
avatar for Kris Kiesling

Kris Kiesling

Director of Archives and Special Collections, Elmer L. Andersen Library, University of Minnesota
Kris Kiesling became Director of Archives Special Collections at the University of Minnesota in 2005. Prior to that appointment, she was Associate Director for Technical and Digital Services at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, at the University of Texas at Austin, and... Read More →
avatar for Adrienne Bell

Adrienne Bell

Book Conservator, Folger Shakespeare Library
Adrienne obtained her MLIS specializing in Preservation from the University of Pittsburgh in 2003. She started as a conservation technician for Etherington Conservation Services in 2004 and advanced to Associate Book Conservator over the next eight years, adding Field Services responsibilities... Read More →
MB

Matt Burriesci

Providence Athenaeum


Thursday June 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom DEF

12:15pm EDT

Lunch Break
Lunch on your own.

Thursday June 20, 2019 12:15pm - 1:45pm EDT

1:30pm EDT

Enoch Pratt Free Library Tour
Take a tour of the Central Library of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, Maryland State Library Resource Center. We have just gone through a most exciting and momentous period in our history—a full-scale historic restoration and renovation. See the highlights of a building instrumental to the changing face of American library architecture in the early 20th century and see it restored to its former architectural beauty. The tour will cover the building’s history and impact on library design, how the renovation has brought back much of its original vision, and how the building is now blended with technology to look to the future.
Schedule:
1:10 p.m. Gather in lobby of Baltimore Marriott to walk/cab/rideshare to Enoch Pratt Free Library
1:30 – 3:00 Tour with Michael K. Johnson, Manager, Special Collections, Enoch Pratt Free Library/Maryland’s State Library Resource Center
3:20 p.m. Return to hotel.

Cost:  Complimentary, maximum 20 people
Registration: First-come, first-served sign up. See Tours page for details.  


Thursday June 20, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm EDT
Enoch Pratt Free Library 400 Cathedral Street Baltimore, MD 21201

1:45pm EDT

Building Resilience: Disaster Preparedness Training for Special Collections
Climate change has greatly increased the force and frequency of weather events. Many special collections and other cultural heritage institutions now find themselves directly threatened on a daily basis by these events through their aging buildings and geographical location, and are experiencing more and more emergency events involving their collections. There are few concrete resources on how to build in-house, institution-specific training programs to prepare for such threats, especially in ways that consistently convince all institutional staff of their crucial necessity.

This panel features four professionals from four different types of institutions, each of whom will discuss their own experiences with building and implementing disaster preparedness training programs and plans for their staff. Institutions include the Smithsonian (a large federal library); James Madison University (a mid-sized university library); the Folger Shakespeare Library (an independent research library); and Howard County Public Libraries (a public library system with historical collections). All four have different experiences with funding, institutional support, and numbers of staff. Panel attendees will be encouraged to think critically about how training might work and be expanded at their home institutions, come away with ideas to reuse or refit current plans, and learn from presenters what worked and what didn't. Speakers will share examples of preparedness elements from their own institutions, including supply stockpiles, different types of plans for different types of collections and operating schedules, a sample timeline of response to an unfolding disaster, and brochures or paper plans.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth DeBold

Elizabeth DeBold

Assistant Curator, Folger
Elizabeth is the Assistant Curator of Collections at Folger Shakespeare Library. As a part of her responsibilities there, she oversees the Collections Disaster Preparedness Committee, which focuses on preparing staff for emergency events where collections are at risk. She holds an... Read More →
avatar for Julia Merkel

Julia Merkel

Preservation Officer, James Madison University
Julia Merkel is the Preservation Officer for James Madison University Libraries. She is part of the Special Collections team and responsible for disaster preparedness, conservation of rare books and manuscripts, curation of artists’ and movable books, and exhibits—as well as music... Read More →
AB

Angela Brade

Howard County Public Library
avatar for Katie C. Wagner

Katie C. Wagner

Conservator, Smithsonian Libraries
Katie Wagner is a rare book conservator for the Smithsonian Libraries. She works primarily with the two special collections libraries: The Joseph F. Cullman 3rd Library and The Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology as well as with the other branches of the Smithsonian... Read More →



Thursday June 20, 2019 1:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
Chesapeake

1:45pm EDT

Environmentally Sustainable Preservation of Physical and Digital Materials
Preservation activities contribute to anthropogenic climate change through the use of physical and digital infrastructures that often are hidden from view. Panelists explore the energy consumption and resultant pollution and greenhouse gas emissions of current preservation infrastructures, and expand the scope of inquiry to reveal the environmental impact embodied in the full lifecycle of these infrastructures. The session provides solutions to reduce our environmental impact by reducing the unsustainability of current practices and proposes a paradigm shift to create truly sustainable practice.


The Physical Storage Environment: Impacts and Solutions
Christopher Cameron
Creating a quality preservation environment for physical collection materials has evolved beyond the idea that ideal conditions are a standard 70°F with 50% relative humidity. When it comes to creating a storage environment, institutions employ a variety of mechanical systems and space arrangements designed to extend the life of their collections. However, inefficient operation, faulty equipment, or inadequate environmental set points may cause damage to collection materials while consuming excess energy. Most collecting institutions are unaware of these issues due to the fact that they are not self-announcing. Christopher summarizes the pitfalls that many collecting institutions encounter within their storage facilities and introduces strategies to identify and correct them.


Data Storage Materiality, E-waste, and Mitigating the Environmental Impact of Audiovisual Digital Content
Linda Tadic
Focusing on audiovisual digital content, preservation of which can consume a large part of an organization’s infrastructure and resources, Linda describes the physical characteristics of digital storage media (e.g., spinning disk drives, solid state drives, and data tapes), discusses the environmental impacts of cloud storage, and provides recommendations on how to responsibly manage, and mitigate the impacts of, e-waste associated with digital storage media and audiovisual carriers.


Toward Environmentally Sustainable Digital Preservation
Laura Alagna and Keith Pendergrass
Laura and Keith present their forthcoming research on the environmental impact of digital preservation.
Laura examines the environmental impact of the information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure on which digital preservation relies by looking at the full life cycle of ICT components, and offers stopgap measures to reduce that impact using currently available technology.
Keith argues that creating environmentally sustainable digital preservation requires a reevaluation of digital preservation practices to allow practitioners to focus on high-value materials through a renewed emphasis on critical appraisal, to reduce the resource-intensity of digital storage and management by rethinking digital permanence, and to meet user needs in different ways by challenging assumptions about the availability of digital content and the need for “always on” digital access infrastructure.


Rachel Trent will moderate a discussion session following the presentations.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Trent

Rachel Trent

Digital Collections and Automation Coordinator, Library of Congress
Digital Collections and Automation Coordinator, Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress
avatar for Laura Alagna

Laura Alagna

Digital Preservation Librarian, Northwestern University
Laura Alagna is the digital preservation librarian at Northwestern University Libraries, where she develops and implements policies and workflows for preserving born-digital and digitized content. Her research interests include repository interoperability, sustainability in digital... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Cameron

Christopher Cameron

Sustainable Preservation Specialist, Image Permanence Institute
Christopher Cameron, Sustainable Preservation Specialist, joined IPI in April 2013. He came to IPI certified in HVAC Maintenance and Repair, having worked as a Facility Manager for eleven years, and serving as Project Manager overseeing various building projects. He received a Bachelor... Read More →
avatar for Keith Pendergrass

Keith Pendergrass

Digital Archivist, Harvard Business School
Keith Pendergrass is the digital archivist for Baker Library Special Collections at Harvard Business School, where he develops and oversees born-digital content workflows. He is also the Library's representative on the HBS Green Team, a School-wide staff group coordinating grassroots... Read More →
avatar for Linda Tadic

Linda Tadic

CEO, Digital Bedrock
Linda Tadic is Founder/CEO of Digital Bedrock, a managed digital preservation service that helps libraries, archives, museums, producers, studios, artists, and individuals preserve their digital content. She is also an adjunct professor in UCLA’s Moving Image Archive Studies program... Read More →



Thursday June 20, 2019 1:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
Stadium Ballroom

1:45pm EDT

Sounding the Depths: Documenting the Environment in Bicoastal Collections
As repositories of material culture, libraries and archives document environmental history both intentionally and serendipitously. By taking a closer look at special collections from the New York Public Library and the University of California at Santa Cruz, presenters will address the research potential of collections for telling the story of human influence on the planet.The first presenter will focus on New York's natural environment, as described in over 350 years of early printed works, specimen books, and contemporary artists' books.  The second will explore the history of urban environmental activism through the archival records of citizens and organizations fighting to preserve New York City’s fragile ecosystem. The final presenter will discuss the 1956-57 partnership of photographers Dorothea Lange and Pirkle Jones to document the death of a small thriving agricultural town in California for the sake of a federal water project, as told through the photography project’s archive and related records.  A throughline of practical patron concerns and outreach will connect the three talks, which combined will foster an introspective look at localized collections and how they can connect to their natural and researcher ecosystems.

Speakers
avatar for Meredith Mann

Meredith Mann

Librarian for Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Books, The New York Public Library
avatar for Jessica Pigza

Jessica Pigza

Outreach & Exhibits Librarian for Special Collections & Archives, UC Santa Cruz
avatar for Kyle R. Triplett

Kyle R. Triplett

Rare Book Librarian, The New York Public Library
Kyle R. Triplett is Librarian in the Manuscrcipts, Archives, and Rare Book Division of The New York Public Library. His specialty areas include descriptive bibliography, history of the printed book, and teaching with collections. Kyle is a Visiting Associate Professor at Pratt Institute... Read More →


Thursday June 20, 2019 1:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
University Ballroom 1-2

1:45pm EDT

Exhibitions and Loans: What Is the Future, and Is It Sustainable?
The Leab Awards were begun in 1987 to promote exhibitions of library and archival materials, and to recognize excellence in the publication of accompanying catalogues and brochures. Since then, the section and the profession have undergone profound and exciting changes in demographics, resources, and core values. In the coming year, the Exhibition Awards Committee will review the Leab Awards criteria to ensure it continues to respond to and encourage practices and values important to the section and the profession, especially the section’s commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion. Meanwhile, the current ACRL/RBMS Guidelines for Interlibrary and Exhibition Loans of Special Collections Materials are also due for an update. As archives and special collections materials are exhibited with increasing frequency in museums and galleries, special collections curators and collection managers find themselves devoting significant time to facilitating exhibition loans to various institutions. While lending to exhibitions provides a valuable opportunity to promote awareness and interaction with collections, preparing collection materials for loan is a complicated, collaborative process which requires input from numerous departments inside and outside the repository.

This participant-driven session will provide a forum for discussion about exhibition planning from concept to practice, covering both loans and exhibitions hosted by one’s home institution. The resulting information will be incorporated into the work of the Exhibition Awards committee to ensure the Leab Awards reflect realities and futures of library exhibitions, as well as passed on to the Task Force to Update the Guidelines for Exhibition and Research Loans. 

Throughout the session, we will engage with questions of sustainability and environmental impact. We will generate ideas for alternatives to traditional components of exhibition prep and loans like paper, foam core, and packing and fuel during transport, as well as discuss ways to re-envision exhibitions themselves in light of climate change, as we assess the environmental impact of digital and physical exhibitions and catalogues. The goal of the session is to generate a set of ideas for reformulating libraries’ approach to exhibitions, both at home and when on loan, to support an inclusive and ecologically aware future.

Moderator
avatar for Francesca Marini

Francesca Marini

Associate Professor, Programming and Outreach Librarian, Texas A&M University
Dr. Francesca Marini is Associate Professor at the Texas A&M University Libraries, where she serves as the Programming and Outreach Librarian, Cushing Memorial Library and Archives (special collections and archives). Francesca is also the Coordinator of the Cushing Library's Internship... Read More →

Speakers
AC

Anna Chen

Head Librarian, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, University of California, Los Angeles
Anna Chen is the Head Librarian at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library. Prior to that, she was curator of rare books and manuscripts and assistant professor of medieval studies and library administration at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. At the U of I, she... Read More →
avatar for Sara Logue

Sara Logue

Head of Public Services, Princeton University
NM

Nicholas Martin

Librarian for Archival Collections, NYU Special Collections


Thursday June 20, 2019 1:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
Promenade

1:45pm EDT

Brainstorming for RBMS 2020: Power, Resistance, and Leadership
Join us for structured conversations around the theme of RBMS 2020: Power, Resistance, and Leadership. The goal of this pop-up is to engage in rich dialogue that will help fuel and energize thinking as we look forward to our time in Bloomington, Indiana. We will leverage the hive-mind of in person attendees and members unable to attend the conference through a simultaneous live Twitter chat.

Speakers
avatar for Robin Katz

Robin Katz

Primary Source Literacy Teaching Librarian, University of California, Riverside
avatar for Elizabeth Call

Elizabeth Call

Special Collections Outreach Librarian, University of Rochester
I am all about all things outreach, teaching, exhibiting, connecting with ALL communities. Am very interested in community archiving so would love to connect with others doing or interested in this work.


Thursday June 20, 2019 1:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
University Ballroom 3-4

1:45pm EDT

Poster Perusal Session II
Enjoy a little extra time with all the great posters presented in Poster Session 2. Presenters may not be present during this time, but feel free to browse at your leisure and soak in all this great visual content.

Thursday June 20, 2019 1:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom East/West

1:45pm EDT

Innovation and Inspiration from Outside the Academy: Learn About Operations at Diverse Collections to Inspire New Ideas
Sponsored by brian cassidy, bookseller 

The majority of the RBMS community is affiliated with an academic institution. Thus, the workflows, tools, and goals of small, independent libraries may be foreign to many conference attendees. Can you imagine being financially barred from OCLC participation?  Sneaking access to research databases?  Putting together a reading room in an attic?  Providing daily instruction to the public?  Or relying on flea markets for collection development?  Independent libraries face uncommon challenges, and their operations are -- by necessity -- creative. Delving into how and why independent libraries function can provoke a radical re-imagining of special collections practice by asking essential questions:  Who are our users?  How do we meet their needs?  How do we preserve social, cultural, political, and other histories for future researchers? Through anecdotes and question-and-answer, this seminar will introduce attendees to small, diverse, independent special collections and their audiences, challenges, and solutions. Topics discussed will include exhibits, public programs, education, cataloging and data management, collection development, and more. Attendees will leave with an expanded rolodex of research referrals, an appreciation of diverse library practice to inform collaborations and recruitment, inspiration for practical, low-budget workflows that can be implemented at their home institution, and a reinvigorated approach to their work.

Moderator
EG

Emily Guthrie

Library Director and NEH Librarian, Printed Book and Periodical Collection, Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library

Speakers
avatar for Michele Lee Silverman

Michele Lee Silverman

Louis B. Thalheimer Associate Librarian for Researcher Services, Folger Shakespeare Library
I recently joined the team at the Folger Shakespeare Library where I manage researcher services. Prior, I have served a variety of roles in museum libraries, all with a focus on connecting people with special collections and fostering new scholarship.
avatar for Katharine Chandler

Katharine Chandler

Cataloger, Library of Congress
I'm a rare books librarian, curator, and cataloger with particular interests in Burgundian/Flemish manuscript culture of the 15th century; books written and published during the Reformation and Counter Reformation in Europe; books written and made by religious immigrants to the mid-Atlantic... Read More →
avatar for Patrick Crowley

Patrick Crowley

Metadata Librarian for Cataloging and Digital Projects, Southern Connecticut State University
I am a special collections librarian and a rare books cataloger. I have served in academic institutions including Bryn Mawr College and Princeton University, providing descriptive metadata on the one hand and research, outreach, and exhibition support on the other. More recently... Read More →
avatar for Alexander Ames

Alexander Ames

Collections Engagement Manager, The Rosenbach / Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation
I am interested in how museology and library science overlap, intersect, and can inform each other in areas like teaching, instruction, and public outreach. Much of my work focuses on exhibition design and public programs development, all with an eye toward linking the interpretation... Read More →


Thursday June 20, 2019 1:45pm - 3:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom DEF

3:15pm EDT

Beverage Break & Poster Session II
A Universal Problem: A Case Study for Collecting and Engaging with the Records of a Displaced Community (Jessica Ritchie, Old Dominion University)

The Tides They Are a-Changin’ : Using Data Mining Techniques to Uncover Environmental Histories within Special Collections Materials (Justin C. Bridges and Alia Levar Wegner, Miami University)

Marine History for the Environment's Future: The Archives of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (Kathleen McCallister, College of William & Mary, and Carol Coughlin, Virginia Institution of Marine Science)

Starting From Scratch: Using a New Start to Ensure We are Holding and Building Relevant Collections (Beth Farwell, Andrea Turner [not in attendance], and Joshua Been [not in attendance], Baylor University)

Before the Black Action Movement: Recognizing African American Students at the University of Michigan (Caitlin Moriarty, University of Michigan)

Special Collections: Changing Climate on Sharing (Jennifer Duncan and Carol Kochan, Utah State University)

See full descriptions of posters from Poster Session II

Speakers
avatar for Carol Kochan

Carol Kochan

Head Collection Management & Resource Sharing, Utah State University Library
Carol Kochan is the Head of Collection Management & Resource Sharing at Utah State University. She has worked in Resource Sharing since 1992. Her research interests include best practices, innovating and improving services for patrons, leadership and management.
avatar for Jennifer Duncan

Jennifer Duncan

Head of Special Collections & Archives, Utah State University - Merrill-Cazier Library
avatar for Jessica Ritchie

Jessica Ritchie

Head of Special Collections and University Archives, Old Dominion University
Jessica Ritchie is the Head of Special Collections and University Archives at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, where she provides leadership for collections and services in Perry Library and the Diehn Composers Room. Jessica also coordinates the Libraries' primary sources/archival... Read More →
CC

Carol Coughlin

Director, Hargis Library, VIMS & College of Willia, Virginia Institution of Marine Science
avatar for Joshua Been

Joshua Been

Director of Data and Digital Scholarship, Baylor University
Provides academic support and outreach in the areas of text analysis, data visualizations, and geospatial research.
avatar for Beth Farwell

Beth Farwell

Director of Central Libraries Special Collections, Baylor University
AL

Alia Levar Wegner

Digital Collections Librarian, Walter Havighurst Special Collections and University Archives
avatar for Justin C. Bridges

Justin C. Bridges

Librarian (Preservation), Miami University Libraries
KM

Kathleen McCallister

College of William & Mary
avatar for Caitlin Moriarty

Caitlin Moriarty

University of Michigan
AT

Andrea Turner

Baylor University


Thursday June 20, 2019 3:15pm - 4:00pm EDT
Grand Ballroom ABC

4:00pm EDT

Looking Back; Moving Forward: Transportation and Civic Exhibition Planning Collections as Resources for Environmental Studies Scholarship
Transportation, from air travel to mass transit, contributes significantly to climate change, through emissions, the embodied energy of the built environment that supports its networks, and the legacies of civic projects and neighborhood expansion. Evidenced in institutional and private collections, in corporation records and ephemera, research centered on transportation as a driver of environmental change demonstrates atypical use of library and archival materials. This session offers three case studies, two from academic libraries, and one focused on a personal collection, to highlight how untapped aspects of popular collections can more broadly illuminate the long timeline of global warming. The session with conclude with a group discussion and Q & A to highlight practical application of case studies at attendee institutions.

Pan Am (Jay Sylvestre)
The Pan American World Airways, Inc. Records (Pan Am) collection at the University of Miami is one of the largest and most comprehensive aviation collections in the United States, and is accessed primarily to study aviation history and tourism. A hidden history within the Pan Am collection is the airline's impact on the field of environmental studies, preservation of local natural resources, and its role in the national conservation movement. In the late 1960s, Pan Am led development on the Everglades Jetport, a proposed 39-square-mile site built for supersonic flight, served by multi-lane highways and high-speed monorails. As proposed, it would've been the "largest airport in the world"; its proposition resulted in both the first ecological impact statement for the state of Florida, and the creation of Big Cypress National Preserve, the first such protected area in the National Parks System.

Environmental Impact Statements (Rachel Cole)
In addition to the climatological effects brought on by vehicular movement of people and goods, transportation infrastructure—bridges, tunnels, roadways, related power and water supplies—leaves a significant environmental footprint. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) collection at Northwestern University’s Transportation Library is one of the largest in the nation, and is available to historians, students, faculty, and citizen activists alike. This case study illustrates how a collection documenting aspects of the federal government’s environmental history is maintained and integrated with transportation research materials, and how researchers utilize the collection to assess governmental and large-scale projects, past and present.

Futurama: Visions of Transportation and the Specter of Climate Change in Three American-Based World's Fairs (Diane Dias De Fazio)
For the World's Fairs, nations and corporations created manufactured environments in the form of pavilions and exhibitions, and urban planners envisioned new pathways in the form of highways and public transportation improvements. The New York ('39-'40, '64-'65) and Knoxville ('82) Fairs included themes: the "World of Tomorrow", and "Energy Runs the World", and all held an implicit emphasis on a future dependent on the drivers of climate change: fuels and emissions, urban sprawl and infrastructure expansion, the American road and mass transit. Through an examination of a private collection, this portion of the session will evaluate how exhibitors and city planners for three American world's fairs presaged future transportation-rooted environmental challenges from behind the scrim of optimism.

Speakers
avatar for Jay Sylvestre

Jay Sylvestre

Special Collections Librarian, University of Miami
Jay Sylvestre, Special Collections Librarian, University of Miami, uses zines in teaching. Nearly every class taught in Special Collections includes zines: students learn and discuss how authority and expertise is demonstrated within zines and how zines expand the voices and people... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Cole

Rachel Cole

Public Services Librarian, Transportation Library, Northwestern University
avatar for Diane Dias De Fazio

Diane Dias De Fazio

Independent Curator of Rare Books and Book Arts


Thursday June 20, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm EDT
Grand Ballroom DEF

4:00pm EDT

Papers on Fire and Earth

Fuel for Archival Advocacy--A public library responds to wildfires (Joanna Kolosov, Sonoma County History & Genealogy Library)

In 2017 Californians, accustomed to battling drought, became intimately acquainted with a new climate norm—wildfires. Though fires took a similar path through Sonoma County in 1964, development ballooned in the intervening years, causing record devastation and staggering economic losses this time around. The History & Genealogy Library, a special collections and archives of the Sonoma County Library system located in Santa Rosa, was right in the thick of it. The fires exposed weaknesses in the library’s infrastructure and communication channels and posed a direct threat to its off-site storage of county government records. This presentation will outline the steps staff have taken to raise awareness of the public library’s special collections, provide disaster preparedness training and tools, develop a community response network of cultural heritage organizations, revitalize collection development and preservation policies and procedures, and document community experiences in the aftermath of the fires. The talk will also address larger conversations happening around fire ecology and the use of fire as a natural resource as well as public libraries offering personal digital archiving services to empower people to preserve and protect their own treasures.

Shake, Rattle, & Roll : Earthquake Preparedness for Libraries  (Allie McCormack and Alison Elbrader, University of Utah)

The University of Utah sits directly on a fault line, and seismologists suggest that Salt Lake City is overdue for a major earthquake. This presentation will discuss what the Marriott Library has done to mitigate this threat so far, future actions that could help safeguard collections, and how other libraries might implement these ideas. The first portion will provide examples of actions the library has taken to protect the building and its collections in the event of an earthquake and subsequent, related disasters. The speakers will give an overview of the seismic renovation done to the building, discuss specific enclosures and other strategies the preservation department has used to protect especially fragile items, and detail what other collection management plans are in the works to further protect collection materials. The second portion will focus on how special collections staff can advocate for monetary funding and cultivate the staff support necessary to implement some of these strategies at their own institutions. The speakers will share some of the conversations that took place at the Marriott Library and how the concerns of various parties were overcome or mitigated. This will include an open discussion of the balance between access, security, and space.

Living Knowledge: Establishing a Seed Sharing Program at the UCLA Clark Library (Anna Chen, Rebecca Fenning Marshall, and Tanya Knipprath, UCLA)
The UCLA William Andrews Clark Library specializes in documentary evidence of 17th- and 18th-century life. While the Clark’s core users have traditionally been advanced scholars and academics, the library is increasingly committed to making to that history accessible to a wider range of audiences, and to contextualizing documentary culture within a larger fabric of material and immaterial forms of memory and knowledge transmission. Gardening, for example, is often an "heirloom" skill; many develop a love of gardening from knowledge that is passed down through families through experiential teaching and learning, sometimes aided but never purely prescribed by books. In the Fall of 2018 we implemented a seed sharing program as a form of outreach, in which patrons can “check out” heirloom seeds at the reference desk, grow them at home, and, when possible, bring back harvested seeds to be checked out to the next patron. This seed library brings together the Clark’s strengths in 17th- and 18th-century gardening manuals and cookbooks; its environmental resources--the Library is situated on five landscaped acres in the middle of an urban residential neighborhood of Los Angeles--and its potential role as a neighborhood educational resource. By bringing the Clark’s collections to life in this way, our goal is to re-seed heirloom knowledge in our community, strengthening our connections to the greater environment and to each other. This presentation will address the impetus and ethos behind establishing a seed library at a special collections library like the Clark, challenges and opportunities in the implementation, and lessons we have learned for the next year of the program.

Speakers
AC

Anna Chen

Head Librarian, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, University of California, Los Angeles
Anna Chen is the Head Librarian at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library. Prior to that, she was curator of rare books and manuscripts and assistant professor of medieval studies and library administration at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. At the U of I, she... Read More →
RF

Rebecca Fenning Marschall

Manuscript & Archives Librarian, Clark Library, UCLA
Becky Fenning Marschall is the Manuscripts and Archives Librarian at UCLA's Clark Library, where she is responsible for the cataloging and management of all non-print materials, in addition to working with her colleagues on collection development, outreach and public programming... Read More →
avatar for Allie McCormack

Allie McCormack

Original Cataloger for Special Collections, University of Utah
Allie McCormack is the Original Cataloger for Special Collections at the University of Utah’s Marriott Library, where she works with a wide variety of materials including medieval manuscripts, 19th-century photography collections, and modern artists’ books. She holds an M.A. in... Read More →
AE

Alison Elbrader

Assistant Librarian, University of Utah, J. Willard Marriott Library
Starting as a student in 2005, Alison has been with the J. Willard Marriott Library Special Collections for fourteen years. Inspired by the sight of the first edition of Galileo's Dialogo, Alison cultivated her passion, earning a BA in History at the University of Utah and, in 2013... Read More →
avatar for Joanna Kolosov

Joanna Kolosov

Special Collections & Archives Librarian, Sonoma County Library
I am a librarian and archivist at the History & Genealogy Library of the public library system of Sonoma County in Northern California. My current interests are documenting and preserving the web, genealogy outreach and reference services, and inclusive archival description. You can... Read More →


Thursday June 20, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm EDT
Chesapeake

4:00pm EDT

The Folger Sustainable Preservation Environment Project

The Folger Shakespeare Library began working on the Folger Sustainable Preservation Environment Project (FSPEP) in 2010.  Funded largely through planning and implementation grants awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections, FSPEP has become a major focus for Collections and Facilities personnel at the Folger.  Working with consultants from the Image Permanence Institute and Linden Preservation Services, the Folger focused on 5 air handlers serving collections storage spaces, including 3 subterranean spaces housing rare materials and one of our reading rooms where a large portion of our paintings collection is hung.  The grants allowed the Folger to collect data on equipment operations; work with consultants to identify areas where optimization was desirable to correct incorrect operations; make capital improvements to 3 of the 5 air handlers involved; capture energy savings through improved performance and renovated equipment; and determine how to seasonal set points would impact collections and costs.  This presentation will focus on the successes and ongoing challenges of the work performed; how unexpected factors can impact desired outcomes; communication and relationship building between divisions; and working through staff changes. Folger staff will also speak to how these grants have influenced future climate needs and planning at the Folger Shakespeare Library.


Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Linden

Jeremy Linden

Principal/Owner, Linden Preservation
Jeremy Linden has been the Principal/Owner of Linden Preservation Services, Inc., since 2017. He is an active educator and consultant with two decades of experience in the cultural heritage field, the last eight years of which have been focused on enhancing preservation environments... Read More →
avatar for Adrienne Bell

Adrienne Bell

Book Conservator, Folger Shakespeare Library
Adrienne obtained her MLIS specializing in Preservation from the University of Pittsburgh in 2003. She started as a conservation technician for Etherington Conservation Services in 2004 and advanced to Associate Book Conservator over the next eight years, adding Field Services responsibilities... Read More →
avatar for Dustin Humbert

Dustin Humbert

Architect/Engineer, Folger Shakespeare Library
Experienced Assistant Director, Facilities & Projects with a demonstrated history of working in the higher education industry. Skilled in Budgeting, Engineering, Facility Management (FM), Cross-functional Team Leadership, and Team Building. Strong program and project management professional... Read More →


Thursday June 20, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm EDT
University Ballroom 1-2

4:00pm EDT

Asian Materials in Special Collections or What to Do with Books that You Can't Read
Asian books, be they Islamic manuscripts or Japanese thread-bound texts, are often under-utilized in special collections education and outreach. This is in part due to their scarcity, but it is also because of persistence of popular conceptions of the book in primarily Euro-centric terms. This pop-up session hopes to initiate a conversation geared towards encouraging deeper engagement with non-Western materials in order to allow us to begin reimagining their place in special collections. Beginning with an examination of several objects, participants will consider some of the great divergences in global book histories. While these divergences can meaningfully point to the differences between seemingly isolated textual traditions, when properly reframed, they can open up new opportunities for teaching the history of the book. With objects in hand, we will then discuss how to begin thinking about collection building without area-subject expertise. We will consider such questions as how to approach purchasing non-European materials for overwhelming Western collections and what to do when confronted by claims that assert unfamiliar materials aren't collecting priorities. Finally, we will see how the diverse, cosmopolitan communities within and around libraries allow us new opportunities to decolonize our collections by making them reflect their constituencies. We hope that our discussion will highlight the limits of conceiving of the book in Euro-centric terms and will spur further reflection on the promise of incorporating more diverse materials into collection development, teaching, and outreach.

Speakers
LR

Lizeth Ramirez

Librarian/Archivist for Los Angeles Communities & Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles
Lizeth Ramírez joined the UCLA Library Special Collections curating team as Librarian/Archivist for Los Angeles Communities and Cultures in March 2019. Prior to joining UCLA, Lizeth was an Archivist and Reference Librarian at the Orange Public Library & History Center in Orange... Read More →
DF

Devin Fitzgerald

Curator of Rare Books and the History of Printing, UCLA
avatar for Caitlin Goodman

Caitlin Goodman

Curator, Rare Book Department, Free Library of Philadelphia
Caitlin has worked in the Special Collections Division of the Free Library of Philadelphia since 2013. She manages the collection-level priorities of the Rare Book Department, and is especially invested in expanding access to collections through a combination of good descriptive practices... Read More →
MS

Molly Schwartzburg

Curator, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia


Thursday June 20, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm EDT
University Ballroom 3-4

4:00pm EDT

Expanding the Special Collections Diversity Ecosystem Through Post-Bac Programs
Sponsored by California Rare Book School

Our seminar will discuss how a diversity ecosystem that has focused chiefly on MLS students would benefit from outreach to undergrads and recent graduates. Earlier outreach is a highly significant effort that has a positive impact on the diversity pipeline into the library profession. While support of current MLS students and new professionals is laudable, additional outreach is needed to encourage individuals from underrepresented groups to apply to library school in the first place. Post-baccalaureate positions offer recent graduates a year-long fellowship opportunity to work in a special collections library. These positions introduce fellows to a variety of professional activities in archives and rare book libraries and provide support to develop a portfolio for application to a graduate program in Library Science or an allied profession. The post-bac programs we highlight in this panel operate in alignment with the RBMS Diversity Committee’s Diversity Toolkit (http://rbms.info/files/committees/diversity/RBMS_DiversityToolkit-2014-10-03.pdf), which provides a framework for librarians to conduct outreach to high school and college students.


Learning Objectives: 
-Participants will come to appreciate the importance of earlier intervention in diversity initiatives through the shared experience of current and former post-bac fellows.
-Participants will learn of the benefits and challenges particular to the post-bac experience.
-Participants will learn how administrators at other institutions have created post-bac programs, and leave with strategies for implementing a similar program at their home institutions. Since post-bacs have so far been chiefly housed in liberal arts colleges, we hope that larger institutions in particular will come to appreciate the benefits of this approach.

Moderator
avatar for Francesca Marini

Francesca Marini

Associate Professor, Programming and Outreach Librarian, Texas A&M University
Dr. Francesca Marini is Associate Professor at the Texas A&M University Libraries, where she serves as the Programming and Outreach Librarian, Cushing Memorial Library and Archives (special collections and archives). Francesca is also the Coordinator of the Cushing Library's Internship... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Conathan

Lisa Conathan

Head of Special Collections, Williams College
MB

Meghan Bryant

William & Mary
AS

Aramis Sanchez

Williams College
avatar for Jacob Hopkins

Jacob Hopkins

Mosaic Fellow, William & Mary
MV

Maria Victoria Fernandez

Cataloguer, Hindman Auctions


Thursday June 20, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm EDT
Stadium Ballroom

4:30pm EDT

Organizing Outside of Bureaucracy (meets offsite at Red Emma's, 1225 Cathedral St., Baltimore, MD).
Sponsored by Arthur Fournier Fine & Rare, LLC

Red Emma's is a radical worker cooperative that has been operating in Baltimore since 2004. Their mission (from their website https://www.redemmas.org/about): “first, to demonstrate, concretely, that it’s possible to build institutions that directly put values like sustainability and democracy to work, and second, in doing so, to build a resource for movements for social justice here in Baltimore.” The space includes meeting rooms, a bookstore, and a restaurant.

At this session, collective members will introduce their project and describe how their principles organize their decision-making and work with each other and the broader community. The attendees will then have an opportunity to ask questions and think through what it might look like to enact some of the principles presented in our work, and even specifically at our workplaces, in small group discussion.

We hope this opportunity will allow us to think about what we might accomplish with non-bureaucratic and non-hierarchical organizational models that allow us to relate to each other, our donors, our patrons, and our collections in more egalitarian and flexible ways. These capacities will be important as we respond to climate change.

Speakers
KN

Karla Nielsen

The Huntington


Thursday June 20, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm EDT
Red Emma's 1225 Cathedral St., Baltimore, MD.

6:00pm EDT

George Peabody Library Preview Tour
Johns Hopkins University’s George Peabody Library is one of Baltimore’s crown jewels of research and learning. Opening in 1878 as a public library, the Peabody Library is known as Baltimore’s “Cathedral of Books” and is consistently ranked among the most beautiful libraries in the world. Join Johns Hopkins University Curator, Paul Espinosa for a behind-the-scenes look at the Peabody, right before the RBMS reception in the same space.

Schedule:
5:40 p.m. Meet in the Baltimore Marriott Lobby to walk/cab/rideshare to Library
6:00 – 6:30 p.m. Behind-the-scenes tour with Paul Espinosa
6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Stay for the reception sponsored by Johns Hopkins University, depart at your leisure.

Cost:  Complimentary, maximum 25 people
Registration: First-come, first-served sign up. See Tours page for details.  


Thursday June 20, 2019 6:00pm - 6:30pm EDT
The George Peabody Library 17 E. Mount Vernon Place Baltimore, MD 21202

6:30pm EDT

George Peabody Library Reception
Sponsored by Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries 

Join your colleagues for drinks and vegetarian, vegan and gluten free appetizers at Johns Hopkins University’s George Peabody Library, one of Baltimore’s crown jewels of research and learning. Opening in 1878 as a public library, the Peabody Library is known as Baltimore’s “Cathedral of Books” and is consistently ranked among the most beautiful libraries in the world.


Thursday June 20, 2019 6:30pm - 8:30pm EDT
The George Peabody Library 17 E. Mount Vernon Place Baltimore, MD 21202
 
Friday, June 21
 

8:00am EDT

Registration
Friday June 21, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am EDT
2nd Floor Foyer

8:30am EDT

Documenting Vulnerable Cultural Heritage in the Great Bay Watershed: A Convergence of Archives, Technology, and Archaeology

The Great Bay Estuary of New Hampshire is the single largest estuarine system on the Gulf of Maine and its rich resources have attracted human settlement for millennia. With European settlement beginning in the 1600s, it became a locale of particular social and economic complexity. This period left a robust suite of tangible cultural heritage sites including standing architecture, buried archaeological sites, and early colonial graveyards. Yet due to its proximity to the watershed, this landscape and the cultural heritage that it holds, is highly threatened by sea-level rise brought on by climate change. In 2016, the UNH Department of Anthropology launched the Great Bay Archaeological Survey to inventory these vulnerable sites. It is a collaborative, community-based effort, drawing on evidence from historical documentation, traditional archaeological survey and excavation, and new mapping technologies. The result is an iterative process for an increasingly targeted program for identifying, documenting, and understanding at-risk early colonial sites in the Great Bay watershed. This panel explores the interconnections between these varied approaches. The first paper discusses the role of research in special collections and archives and how essential this work is in identifying significant cultural heritage sites before they are washed away. The second paper examines how new digital mapping technologies, including GIS, GPR and drones, are helping advance and expedite the study of these sites as they are found. The final paper explores the specific threats that sea-level rise poses to early colonial heritage sites and examines the hard questions that communities will face regarding what to preserve and what to let go.


Speakers
avatar for Bill Ross

Bill Ross

Professor and Head, Special Collections and Archives Division, University of New Hampshire
Bill Ross has been Special Collections Librarian at UNH since 1990. He has a BA in American history from East Carolina University, an MA in history and an MLS in library science from the University of Maryland, and a Ph.D. in educational administration from American University. His... Read More →
EM

Emily Mierswa

Simon Fraser University
MH

Meghan Howey

University of New Hampshire


Friday June 21, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am EDT
University Ballroom 3-4

8:30am EDT

Papers on Storytelling and Longevity
A Wider View of the Arctic: Indigenous-Language Materials on the Shelf and in the Classroom
Indigenous communities around the world are at the forefront of the adverse effects of climate change. In the Arctic, where global warming takes place at an accelerated pace, the Inuit and Sami People are faced with serious challenges in their efforts to maintain their cultural and linguistic identities, which have a rich but often underappreciated history. The literature of Arctic exploration is a long-established collecting area in many special collections libraries. However, the voices of the Indigenous People who encountered and aided these European and American explorers are generally not nearly as well documented in these same spaces, although many examples of Indigenous-language material exist. For instance, by the mid-nineteenth century, at the height of the British search for the Franklin Expedition, Greenlanders were publishing a newspaper written entirely in their own language, Kalaallisut, with the assistance of the Danish colonial administrator Hinrich Rink. This talk is based on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s efforts to expand the scope of a recently re-cataloged Arctic collection to include such Indigenous voices, beginning with the acquisition of that first Greenlandic newspaper. It provides practical information about acquiring Arctic materials in Indigenous languages while also making a case for how these materials can most effectively be used in classroom instruction and other activities. Because many works in Indigenous languages, especially the earliest examples, involve some level of mediation through missionaries or colonial administrators, these materials raise unique challenges and opportunities in their use in the special collections classroom.

"For Beauty, Grace, and Fragrance Are All Gone": Preserving Botanicals in the Anthropocene
Current efforts to study and preserve biodiversity, like those at the the Kew Herbarium, the Millennium Seed Bank, and the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, are intended to help us identify plants from across the world and provide access to a variety of seeds that might be more viable as climate change progresses. This paper looks at the longer history of herbarium making and seed saving, from the practices of men like Alexander von Humboldt and John Bartram to those of the great numbers of nineteenth-century amateur botanists, poets, students, and children who gathered and preserved specimens. More importantly this presentation looks at how these specimens have been preserved, or not preserved, in our libraries in their original newspapers, books, autograph albums, herbaria, journals, and letters. In discussing examples drawn primarily from the collections of the American Antiquarian Society (AAS), this paper also explores the challenges of preserving and conserving individual specimens. How do we catalog and preserve botanicals that have been removed from collections, an action that often occurs during the digitizing process? How do we locate traces of botanical specimens in collections, such as those of a nonextant dandelion once pressed in an Emily Dickinson poem? How do we catalog albums or journals that contain botanicals? How do our conservators preserve botanical specimens that remain in books and manuscripts? How do we handle specimens that have been separated from the volumes and paper in which they were pressed? As librarians, curators, archivists, scholars, and conservators, we should and do have an affinity for earlier herbarium makers who saw themselves preserving plants for science or sentiment or both. Ultimately, the study and preservation of specimens from the past helps us to understand the need for preservation of botanical specimens in the present.

Archives in Action: Catalyzing Ecological Awareness
This presentation will examine ways in which stories from the archives can illuminate forms of mobilization and collaboration to protect open space. Open spaces in cities and other densely populated areas can provide significant ecological functions and values to help human and natural communities become more resilient to climate change. Grassy and woody open spaces can sequester carbon and reduce air pollution and surface runoff. Open spaces that feature biking and walking trails can improve commuting and simultaneously reduce reliance on fossil fuels thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Despite their potential, the protection, preservation, and creation of open spaces can be highly contested. Pressure for space to accommodate an ever-growing population and to develop land for economic gains challenges our communities, industries, and governing bodies to conserve land for ecological good. Drawing on reports, photographs, testimonies, and other primary sources from UC Irvine Libraries Special Collections & Archives, we will explore how open space was preserved in Orange County, California and how the documentation can provide models for catalyzing ecological awareness. Orange County is the smallest county in southern California, yet it is the richest in public lands – it is home to over 55,000 acres of open space. Yet it is no coincidence that so much land in the region is preserved. By reflecting on the processes of confrontation, collaboration, and compromise to address environmental concerns that took place in Orange County, the panel will consider how special collections and archives can serve students, educators, historians, environmentalists, companies, and policymakers in their efforts to identify and implement ways to make their human and natural communities more resilient to threats of climate change.

Speakers
AC

Ashley Cataldo

Assistant Curator of Manuscripts, American Antiquarian Society
avatar for Krystal Tribbett

Krystal Tribbett

Curator for Orange County Regional History, Research Librarian for Orange County, UC Irvine
I am interested in community-based archives, collection strategies to build regional history archives, diversity and inclusion, and postcustodial theory and practice.
avatar for Adam V. Doskey

Adam V. Doskey

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
DC

Derek Christian Quezada

Outreach & Public Services Librarian, Special Collections & Archives, University of California, Irvine


Friday June 21, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am EDT
Chesapeake

8:30am EDT

Under the Weather: Strategies for Planning and Response to Climate Change for Heritage Organizations
Climate change poses significant short and long term threats to the operations and stability of archival institutions and collections across space and time. In the short term, changing weather and disasters may mean more frequent or severe wildfires, hurricanes, and flooding. In the long term, archives may be caught up in larger community conversations around inland migration or relocation as coastal locations are threatened by sea-level rise. The impacts of climate change on archives reverberate at the local, regional, national, and global scales. This seminar will explore the ways in which archivists are building local disaster preparation networks incorporating archives and the broader cultural heritage community, how developing a statewide emergency response network informs preparation for the future, and how national data on archives can give us a glimpse into the large-scale risks we face.


Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Boyne

Elizabeth Boyne

Rare Book Library Associate, Tulane University
Elizabeth Boyne is the Rare Book Library Associate at Tulane University, where she performs collection management, reference, and outreach for the university’s collection of rare books. Prior to her work at Tulane, she worked in the conservation field, first as a conservation technician... Read More →
avatar for Fletcher Durant

Fletcher Durant

Head of Conservation and Preservation, University of Florida
Fletcher Durant is the Head of Conservation and Preservation at the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries. He is responsible for the care and treatment of the Libraries’ 6+ million volumes and 13+ million items in the Digital Collections. His work focuses on the preventive... Read More →
avatar for Eira Tansey

Eira Tansey

Digital Archivist/Records Manager, University of Cincinnati
Eira Tansey is the digital archivist and records manager at the University of Cincinnati's Archives and Rare Books Library. She has previously written about Cincinnati's public libraries, the visibility and compensation of archivists' labor, and the effects of climate change on archival... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Waxman

Jennifer Waxman

Archives Manager, National WW II Museum
Jennifer Waxman is an archivist, collection manager, and consultant specializing in paper-based collections, analog and digital preservation, emergency preparedness and disaster response. She currently works as the Archives Manager at the National WWII Museum and serves as Chair of... Read More →


Friday June 21, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am EDT
Grand Ballroom DEF

8:30am EDT

STEM Teaching & Outreach + Special Collections: Climate Change
Sponsored by Swann Galleries

Teaching and outreach with rare books and manuscripts are essential components of many special collections libraries, regardless of where they are located. There are many examples of successful special collections collaborations in humanities and social sciences, such as in history, literature and art. However, interfacing with teaching and outreach in STEM fields continues to pose a significant challenge for special collections. This session argues that special collections are poised to be important sources of information about the history of, as well as reflections on, the modern state of scientific fields, as well as sites for conversation and collaboration between the sciences and humanities.

In this participant-driven session, Emily Beck and Lois Hendrickson of the Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine, Marguerite Ragnow of the James Ford Bell Library, and Amanda Wick of the Charles Babbage Institute at the University of Minnesota will facilitate a collaborative discussion on methods of engaging with modern conversations around and practices in STEM fields. These session leaders specialize in rare materials on medicine and biology, maps and other documents related to cartography, and archives on the history of computing and information technologies. This World-Cafe-style workshop will use Coggle to create a large-scale idea map exploring ways of using resources across temporal and disciplinary boundaries to facilitate an exploration of STEM-focused teaching and outreach by considering the many ways that science has been contextualized, understood, and employed by people in different time periods. Guiding users through this type of engagement with special collections is a powerful tool for developing understanding and critical inquiry related to current scientific conversations, such as climate change. This workshop will create a dynamic resource for participants to take back to their home institutions and use while planning teaching and outreach sessions around STEM themes. If possible, participants should bring an internet connected device (laptop, phone, tablet) to this session.
This session will give participants the tools to use materials in their collections, whether they explicitly relate to science or not, to engage with their users about current scientific conversations around climate change and the environment. Historians of science, technology, and medicine have demonstrated that contextualizing modern conversations about science using historical information is not only interesting, but is essential for understanding the ways that professionals and the public engage with scientific information. Special collections can be active participants in this practice if they are able to build a more robust understanding of how those linkages can be made and those conversations can be facilitated. This session intends to be both a forum and a resource for building a networked concept map that participants will be able to use in their home institutions while engaging with students and the public about climate and the environment.

Speakers
LH

Lois Hendrickson

Curator, Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine, University of Minnesota
AW

Amanda Wick

Archivist, Charles Babbage Institute, Charles Babbage Institute Archives, University of Minnesota
Amanda Wick is the interim archivist at the Charles Babbage Institute (CBI) at the University of Minnesota. Prior to working at CBI, Amanda led major processing projects at the University of Minnesota and managed the archives of the Theatre Historical Society.
avatar for Emily Beck

Emily Beck

Assistant Curator, Wangensteen Library, University of Minnesota
Emily Beck, PhD, is the Assistant Curator of the Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests include premodern manuscript recipes, reconstructing historical materialities, the history of scientific illustration, and... Read More →
avatar for Marguerite Ragnow

Marguerite Ragnow

Curator, James Ford Bell Library, University of Minnesota


Friday June 21, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am EDT
Promenade

8:30am EDT

Poster Perusal Session III
Enjoy a little extra time with all the great posters presented in Poster Session 3. Presenters may not be present during this time, but feel free to browse at your leisure and soak in all this great visual content.

Friday June 21, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am EDT
Grand Ballroom ABC

8:30am EDT

Beyond Commerce: Encounters and Exchanges Between Academic Institutions and the Rare Book Trade
Sponsored by Liber Antiquus Early Printed Books & Manuscripts

This seminar explores relationships between the academic world and the rare book trade from the perspectives of booksellers and university faculty, including librarians. The starting point for this seminar is Miranda Nesler’s recent experience changing fields from university professor to rare bookseller. How have her priorities changed? What remains the same? How does she use her position as a rare bookseller to recognize and preserve materials relevant to marginalized communities and individuals? The next portion of our seminar will explore tensions between academic libraries and the rare book trade and how those tensions affect the trade. Rob Rulon-Miller, director of the Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminars and a former president of the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA), will share his experiences working with university libraries. This portion of the seminar will also highlight how booksellers can work effectively with librarians and archivists to preserve rare materials that might otherwise be destroyed or lost in private collections. Elizabeth Ott, the Frank Borden Hanes Curator of Rare Books at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will speak on working with rare booksellers from an academic librarian’s perspective. We will then break into groups to discuss ethical and practical questions librarians and booksellers face in their day-to-day work, such as breaking up collections, asking about the provenance of books and manuscripts, and other issues. We will reconvene after a short period of discussion and invite each group to share their responses.

Speakers
RR

Rob Rulon-Miller

Rulon-Miller Books
Rob Rulon-Miller is a bookseller based in St. Paul, Minnesota, and a long-time member of the ABAA.
GS

Gregg Seppi

Brigham Young University
Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University
avatar for Miranda Garno Nesler

Miranda Garno Nesler

Whitmore Rare Books
Associate in charge of developing institutional client relationships and resident specialist in women's history and social movements.
EO

Elizabeth Ott

Frank Borden Hanes Curator of Rare Books, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Friday June 21, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am EDT
University Ballroom 1-2

8:30am EDT

Do Your Metrics Measure Up? Assessment & Implementing the New Standards for Public Services Statistics
Sponsored by University of Michigan Library

This seminar will be led by a diverse group of librarians and archivists (including a mix of three first-time RBMS presenters and seasoned members) who are early adopters of the newly-approved Standardized Statistical Measures and Metrics for Public Services in Archival Repositories and Special Collections Libraries. The session will begin with a moderated panel showing how the presenters have used the new measures to document impact, articulate value, advocate for resources, inform decision-making, and shape sustainable programs. Use of interactive real-time polls will create a rich and highly energetic learning environment. The bulk of the time will be dedicated to breakout sessions for attendees interested in taking immediate action to start implementing the new standards. Participants will leave the seminar with practical strategies that can be used and adapted for a wide range of repositories around issues such as which measures to adopt, gaps in the standards, and tools for data collection .

Speakers
avatar for Robin Katz

Robin Katz

Primary Source Literacy Teaching Librarian, University of California, Riverside
avatar for Moira Fitzgerald

Moira Fitzgerald

Head of Access Services, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Yale University
Moira Fitzgerald is the Head of Access Services at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library (Yale University), a position she has held since 2015. In this role, she is responsible for all of the Beinecke's remote and on-site public services functions. Her interests include the... Read More →
avatar for Jay-Marie Bravent

Jay-Marie Bravent

Special Collections Research Center, University of Kentucky Libraries
avatar for Malgosia Myc

Malgosia Myc

Assistant Director for Reference and Academic Programs, University of Michigan
Malgosia Myc is an Assistant Director for Reference and Academic Programs at the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. Under her leadership the Aeon system and new ideas for improving the function and operation of the Reference and Academic Programs were successfully... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Hawk

Amanda Hawk

Head of Public and Research Services, Louisiana State University
I manage and coordinate all aspects of LSU Special Collections' reference services and oversee the public services staff. I contribute to outreach efforts, manage assessment and metrics, and help provide direction for research services at LSU.
avatar for Elizabeth Call

Elizabeth Call

Special Collections Outreach Librarian, University of Rochester
I am all about all things outreach, teaching, exhibiting, connecting with ALL communities. Am very interested in community archiving so would love to connect with others doing or interested in this work.


Friday June 21, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am EDT
Stadium Ballroom

10:00am EDT

Beverage Break & Poster Session III
Untold Stories: Using Local Histories, Newspapers, and Maps to Reveal Environmental Shift (Diane Dias De Fazio, The University of Iowa)

Preserving the History of the Heartland: The Race to Archive Iowa's Historic Barns Against Climate Change (Jenna Silver, The University of Iowa)

Discovering Hidden Connections via SNAC Visualizations: Climate Thinkers and Their Cohorts, Expected and Unexpected (Jerry Simmons [not in attendance], Dina Herbert [not in attendance], and Elizabeth Wilkinson, University of Virginia)

Scaling Up Special Collections: Student-curated Exhibits with Large Classes (Juli McLoone and Kristine Greive [not in attendance], University of Michigan)

Mapping Manuscript Migrations - Using Linked Data to Connect Pre-modern Manuscripts Datasets (Emma Cawlfield, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, University of Pennsylvania)

Short-Term Staffing Solutions in Special Collections (Keith Phelan Gorman and Kathelene McCarty Smith, University of North Carolina -- Greensboro)

See full descriptions of posters from Poster Session III

Speakers
KG

Keith Gorman

Assistant Dean for Special Collections and University Archives, University Libraries, UNC-Greensboro
avatar for Kathelene McCarty Smith

Kathelene McCarty Smith

Interim Head, Special Collections and University Archives, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Kathelene McCarty Smith is currently Photograph, Artifact, and Textile Archivist at The Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). She has a master’s degree in Art History from Louisiana State University... Read More →
JS

Jerry Simmons

External Agency Liaison to SNAC, National Archives and Records Administration
I'm working as NARA's link to SNAC (Social Networks and Archival Context), working with other SNAC partners to stand up this new data cooperative. I'm all about linking creators of archival materials together in context, and linking them all to their original archival collections... Read More →
avatar for Dina Herbert

Dina Herbert

SNAC Liaison, National Archives
Dina Herbert is the National Archives liaison to Social Networks and Archival Contexts (SNAC) where she is responsible for working with partner organizations, editing SNAC, training, social media, and more. Prior to that she was the Coordinator for the Innovation Hub at the National... Read More →
EW

Elizabeth Wilkinson

Archivist, University of Virginia
Elizabeth is the Archivist in the Albert & Shirley Small Special Collections and Archives at the University of Virginia where she coordinates archival processing, description, and dissemination. She holds an MA in History and an MLS from Indiana University.
avatar for Diane Dias De Fazio

Diane Dias De Fazio

Independent Curator of Rare Books and Book Arts
avatar for Juli McLoone

Juli McLoone

Curator, Special Collections Research Center, University of Michigan Library
Juli McLoone is a Curator in the University of Michigan Library Special Collections Research Center, where she is responsible for the Children’s Literature Collection, the Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive, the Hubbard Collection of Imaginary Voyages, literary and theater... Read More →
avatar for Jenna Silver-Baustian

Jenna Silver-Baustian

Processing Librarian/Records Manager, University of Iowa
KG

Kristine Greive

University of Michigan
ET

Emma Thomson

Project manager, University of Pennsylvania


Friday June 21, 2019 10:00am - 10:45am EDT
Grand Ballroom ABC

10:45am EDT

Plenary 3: What a Living World Demands
Sponsored by Bonhams

In Parable of the Sower, a 1993 dystopian science fiction novel set in the wake of major climate change, Octavia E. Butler writes, “There is no end | To what a living world | Will demand of you.” Our collections, institutions, and communities have arisen from colonial and extractive industrial contexts - the same conditions and systems driving anthropogenic climate change. Our closing plenary examines how climate change relates to these systems’ legacies of harm, and how history, memory work, and speculative imagining illuminate possibilities for challenging these systems in order to build more sustainable and equitable living worlds.

Speakers:

Moderator
avatar for Robin Katz

Robin Katz

Primary Source Literacy Teaching Librarian, University of California, Riverside

Speakers
avatar for Ramesh Mallipeddi

Ramesh Mallipeddi

Associate Professor of English, University of Colorado-Boulder
Ramesh Mallipeddi received his PhD from Cornell University in 2008, specializing in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature. His research on sentimentalism, transatlantic slavery, and the British empire has appeared in _Eighteenth-Century Studies_, _The Eighteenth Century... Read More →
avatar for Shelley Streeby

Shelley Streeby

Professor and Director of Clarion Workshop, University of California San Diego
SHELLEY STREEBY is professor of ethnic studies and literature at the University of California, San Diego. Her book Imagining the Future of Climate Change: World- Making through Science Fiction and Activism was published by the University ofCalifornia Press in the American Studies... Read More →



Friday June 21, 2019 10:45am - 12:15pm EDT
Stadium Ballroom

12:15pm EDT

RBMS Meetings at the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Washington, DC, Saturday, June 22-Monday, June 24

RBMS meetings at ALA Annual will be held in the following locations:
WCC – Walter E. Washington Convention Center - 801 Mt. Vernon Place NW
HIL – Washington Hilton - 1919 Connecticut Avenue NW
MAR – Marriott Marquis Washington DC - 901 Massachusetts Avenue NW
 
For additional information on the ALA Annual Conference in Washington, DC, please see the ALA Annual 2019 website at https://2019.alaannual.org/.

Friday June 21, 2019 12:15pm - 5:00pm EDT